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Pacific Southwest, Region 9: Superfund

Serving Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, the Pacific Islands, and Tribal Nations

Fort Ord

EPA #: CA7210020676

State: California(CA)

County: Monterey

City: 2 miles north of Monterey

Congressional District: 17

Other Names:

Description and History

NPL Listing History

NPL Status: Final

Proposed Date: 07/14/89

Final Date: 02/21/90

Deleted Date:

The 27,827-acre Fort Ord site was established in 1917 by the US Army as a maneuver area and field artillery target range. In 1991, Fort Ord was selected for decommissioning but the post did not formally close until 1994. Prior to closing in September 1994, the base's primary mission was training infantry military personnel.

EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List in 1990. The site contained leaking petroleum underground storage tanks, a 150 acre landfill that was primarily used to dispose of residential waste and small amounts of commercial waste generated by the base, a former fire drill area, motor pool maintenance areas, small dump sites, small arms target ranges, an 8,000 acre firing range, and other limited areas that pose threats from unexploded ordnance.

Approximately 3,484 acres of Fort Ord is undergoing a so-called "privatized" cleanup. Under the privatized cleanup scheme, Fort Ord Reuse Authority received these properties through early transfer and is responsible for the cleanup of these portions of Fort Ord.

Approximately 40,000 people obtain drinking water from wells located within 3 miles of the site.

The Salinas River alluvial basin, El Toro Creek, and Monterey Bay border the site.

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Contaminants and Risks

Contaminated Media
  • Groundwater
  • Soil and Sludges

Groundwater:

Groundwater is contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in various locations. One of the contaminated groundwater plumes near the City of Marina migrated off site and has been remediated with no further action required. All the groundwater treatment systems have been constructed and are operational. Contaminated groundwater at Fort Ord is not being used as a drinking water source.

Soil:
Soils in several vehicle maintenance and motor pool areas, and a 150 acre landfill and some munitions response sites have been contaminated with chemicals that spilled onto the ground. In addition, soils at target ranges are contaminated with lead. These contaminated soils have been addressed, as described below, significantly reducing or eliminating the potential threat to public health.

Munitions and explosives of concern:
Unexploded ordnance and munitions and explosives of concern on an 8,000 acre firing range/impact area and at limited on-site areas may pose safety hazards. Types of ordnance found at Fort Ord include artillery projectiles, rockets, hand grenades, land mines, pyrotechnics, bombs and other demolition materials. The Army has an extensive site security program and they ensure that known munitions sites are fenced, posted with warning signs and are off-limits to unauthorized people.

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Who is Involved

The majority of this site is being addressed by the U.S. Army, with EPA oversight. A Federal Facility Agreement was signed by the Army, EPA, California Department of Toxic Substances Control and the California Regional Water Quality Control Board Central Coast Region in 1990.


In addition, the Fort Ord Reuse Authority is responsible for the cleanup of Privatized Cleanup portion of Fort Ord with Army and EPA oversight. Fort Ord Reuse Authority voluntarily entered into an Administrative Order on Consent with EPA and California Department of Toxic Substances Control for the cleanup of these parcels in May 2007. The Administrative Order on Consent requires FORA to clean up the parcels to an extent that would protect human health and environment.

Project Manager Contact List

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Investigation and Cleanup Activities

The cleanup and investigation of Fort Ord is separated into three programs: the Army's Soil and Groundwater Contamination Cleanup Program, the Army's Munitions and Explosives of Concern (MEC) Program, and the Fort Ord Reuse Authority's Privatized Cleanup Program.


Munitions and Explosive of Concern Program specific information
To streamline the cleanup of munitions and explosives of concern, the Army utilizes a tracking process to evaluate and address sites at various phases of investigation to move through the decision-making process faster. According to this tracking process, a munitions site on Fort Ord is assigned to one of four Tracks, Track 0 through Track 3.

Track 0 sites are sites that have no evidence of use of munitions and explosives of concern.
Track 1 sites are sites where munitions and explosives of concern were suspected but no further remedial action were deemed necessary to protect human health and the environment.
Track 2 sites are sites where munitions and explosives of concern were found and a removal action was conducted by the Army to clean it up.
Track 3 sites are sites where munitions and explosives of concern are known to be present but no cleanup has been conducted yet.


Five Year Review Status
The third comprehensive five year review for the former Fort Ord site has been completed. The Third Five Year Review Report found that with the two exceptions identified below where the protectiveness determination has been deferred, the all the remedies evaluated are protective of human health and the environment.

Sites where protectiveness statement are deferred:

    • Sites 2 and 12: A protectiveness determination for soil vapor exposure cannot be made at this time because of changed site conditions. Recent increases of contaminant of concern (COC) concentrations in groundwater have changed the potential soil vapor exposure and associated risk. EPA concurs with the recommendation that further evaluation is needed to determine actual risk. In the interim, Sites 2 and 12 groundwater remedy is protective of human health and the environment because potential exposure pathways to groundwater are being controlled.
    • Site 3 Beach Trainfire Ranges, Basewide RI Sites-Site 31 Former East Garrison Dump Site, Basewide RI Sites-Site 39 Impact Area, Interim Action (IA) Sites-Contaminated Soil Surface Remediation area : A protectiveness determination cannot be made for human health at these sites because of the changes made to the California Office Of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) health guidance value for lead in blood and the methodology used to calculate human health based cleanup levels may affect protectiveness of human health. The sites are protective of the environment.
.

Initial Actions

Initial Actions

Soil and Groundwater Contamination Program
Currently, there are no more soil and groundwater initial actions. All soil and groundwater contamination sites are in the Cleanup Ongoing or Cleanup Complete stage.

Army Munitions and Explosives of Concern Program
Remaining RI/FS Sites:
The Army is evaluating the areas where munitions response actions were not completed on the Former Fort Ord. The Army has completed various Technical Memorandums proposing site assessment approaches.

Privatized Munitions and Explosives of Concern Program
Currently, there are no initial actions under the Privatized Munitions and Explosives of Concern Program. All privatized munitions and Explosives of Concern sites are in the Site Studies phase.

Site Studies

Site Studies

Soil and Groundwater Contamination Program
Currently, there are no ongoing soil and groundwater contamination site studies. All soil and groundwater contamination sites are in the Cleanup Ongoing or Cleanup Complete stage.

Army Munitions and Explosives of Concern Program
The Army is conducting a Munitions and Explosives of Concern (MEC) site assessment on BLM land east of the inland range area. The area was divided into four study areas:
-BLM East Post 1940 (Southern Portion)
-BLM East Post 1940 (Northern Portion)
-BLM East Pre 1940 (Northern and Southern Portion)
-BLM North (North/South Portions).
The site assessments will determine if the parcels qualify for Track 1 (no MEC issues) or Track 2 status in the MEC program. A Track 2 parcel will need an RI/FS to determine if MEC remediation is needed.

Privatized Munitions and Explosives of Concern Program
Group 1 Seaside Munitions Response Area and Parker Flats Munitions Response Area Phase II:
This is the first cleanup study conducted under the Privatized Cleanup Scheme. Fort Ord Reuse Authority (FORA) submitted the Final RI/FS Work Plan for the Group 1 Seaside Munitions Response Area and Parker Flats Munitions Response Area on December 17, 2008 (Final Group 1 RI/FS Work Plan). The objectives of this work plan is to outline the steps that will be taken to gather additional data to fully characterize the Phase II Area of the Parker Flats Munitions Response Area, to assess the explosive safety risks that may be present at the Seaside and Parker Flats Munitions Response Area Phase II, and to evaluate alternatives which may be used to reduce the potential explosive safety risks to current and future property owners and the general public within the Parker Flats Munitions Response Area Phase II and the Seaside Munitions Response Area. As part of the Final Group 1 RI/FS work plan, FORA developed a draft Residential Quality Assurance protocol and is currently evaluating the effectiveness of the draft Residential Quality Assurance protocol through various pilot studies.

Group 2 California State University at Monterey Bay Off-Campus and County North Munitions Response Areas:
This is the second cleanup study conducted under the Privatized Cleanup Scheme. FORA submitted the Draft Group 2 Remedial Investigation Report/Feasibility Study on September 17, 2009 (Draft Group 2 RI/FS). The Draft Group 2 RI/FS defines the nature and extent of MEC contamination, assesses explosive safety risks present, and develops screens and evaluates alternatives to reduce the potential explosive safety risks to current and future property owners and public. Based on investigation results, County North Munitions Response Areas meets Track 1 was removed from the Group 2 RI/FS and placed under the Track 1 Plug-in ROD. Draft Group 2 RI/FS is on hold pending the completion of the Residential Quality Assurance protocol.

Group 3 Interim Action Ranges, Military Operations in Urban Terrain, Leguna Seca Parking, and Del Rey Oaks/Monterey Munitions Response Areas:
This is the third cleanup study conducted under the Privatized Cleanup Scheme. FORA submitted the Final Group 3 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Del Rey Oaks/Monterey, Leguna Seca Parking, and Military Operations in Urban Terrain Site Munitions Response Area (Draft Final Group 3 RI/FS) on July 31, 2012. The Final Group 3 RI/FS defines the nature and extent of MEC contamination, assesses explosive safety risks present, and develops screens and evaluates alternatives to reduce the potential explosive safety risks to current and future property owners and public. Based on the need for additional investigations, Interim Action Ranges Munitions Response Area was removed from the Group 3 RI/FS and will be addressed separately.

Group 4 Future East Garrison Munitions Response Area:
This is the fourth cleanup study conducted under the Privatized Cleanup Scheme. FORA submitted the Final Group 4 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan, Future East Garrison Munitions Response Area on October 8,2010. This Work Plan outlines the steps that will be taken to:1) evaluate whether the nature and extend of MEC contamination has been adequately characterized; 2) assess explosive safety risk that may be present; and 3) develop, screen, and evaluate alternatives to reduce the potential explosive safety risk to current and future property owners and the general public.

Remedy Selected

Remedy Selected

In total 20 Record of Decisions and Explanation of Significant Differences have been signed at Fort Ord.

Soil and Groundwater Contamination Program
Soil Interim Action Plug-in ROD:
An Interim Action Plug-in ROD was signed by EPA, the Army, and the State in March 1994, to address sites with limited soil contamination by soil excavation. The Plug-in ROD identifies the criteria each potential site must be evaluated against. If a site meets all the criteria, the Army can remediate the site by soil excavation according to the Plug-in ROD. The interim actions are focused on addressing primarily surface soils contaminated with fuels and waste oils from motor pools. Soils will be excavated and then treated at a treatment area using bioremediation. Since 1994, 20 sites have met the plug-in criteria.

Soil No-Action Plug-in ROD:
A No-Action Plug-in ROD was signed in April 1995. The ROD was designed for sites where soil sampling results indicate levels are below concern. A thirty (30) day public comment period is held for sites that meet the No-Action criteria. Since 1995, ten sites have met the No-Action ROD criteria.

Basewide RI Sites ROD:
In 1990, the Army began further investigations into the nature and extent of on- and off-site soil and groundwater contamination, as well as any ecological or health threats that may be present. The investigation identified three waste disposal sites, firing ranges, and a vehicle maintenance area that require extensive cleanup actions. The Army completed the RI/FS and ROD in 1997. Based on addition information regarding Site 39, the Army conducted additional investigation on Site 39 after the Basewide RI/FS and determined that additional action is required at Site 39. Therefore, Site 39 was separated from the Basewide RI/FS. The Record of Decision for Site 39 was signed on September 30 2009.

Fritzsche Army Airfield Practice Fire Area (Operable Unit 1):
An investigation into the nature and extent of contamination in the Fritzsche Army Airfield practice fire area began in 1984. The ROD was signed in September 1995.

Fort Ord Landfill (Operable Unit 2):
The Army selected a remedy in the fall of 1994 that included capping the landfill and installing a groundwater pump and treatment system. Construction of the groundwater treatment system is complete and is operational. In May 1995, the Army proposed to consolidate wastes from several areas around the main landfill which would provide more clean land for re-use. The changes are documented in the Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) in January 1997. In August 16, 2007, the Army proposed no further action for munitions and explosives of concern, the implementations of landfill gas control measures, and the reuse of treated groundwater from the OU2 treatment plan for purpose other than groundwater recharge. These changes were document in the October 4, 2006 ESD.

Carbon Tetrachloride Plume Operable Unit:
The Army completed a remedial investigation/feasibility study of the so-called "carbon tetrachloride plume operable unit", near the City of Marina. The selected alternative is bioremediation and monitored natural attenuation for the groundwater. EPA signed the ROD on February 6, 2008.


Army Munitions and Explosives of Concerns Program
Track 0 Sites:
Track 0 Record of Decision (ROD) was signed on June 19, 2002.

Track 1 Sites:
Track 1 ROD was signed on April 6, 2005. I

Track 2 Sites:
Parker Flats Munitions Response Site Record of Decision:
The first of several Track 2 RODs was completed for the 600 acre Parker Flats site on August 20, 2008.
Del Rey Oaks Munitions Response Site Record of Decision:
The second Track 2 RI/FS was completed for the 272 acres Del Rey Oaks site on August 22, 2007. The Track 2 approved by the EPADel Rey Oaks ROD wassigned on November 21, 2008.

Track 3 Sites:
Impact Area Munitions Response Site Record of Decision:
The first Track 3 RI/FS is for the 6,560-acre portion of the 8,000-acre historical Impact Area. This Track 3 site is entirely within the natural resources management area described in the Installation-wide Multispecies Habitat Management Plan for Former Fort Ord, California and is currently identified for transfer to the Bureau of Land Management. The ROD was approved by the EPA on May 15, 2008.


Privatized Munitions and Explosives of Concern Program
County North Munitions Response Area:
On February 23, 2010, EPA approved the Army’s proposal to “plug-in” the County North Munitions Response Area included in the Approval Memorandum to the Track 1 ROD dated February 16, 2010. In addition, EPA agrees with the Army’s recommendation that despite no further action is required for munitions and explosives of concern at the Track 1 County North Munitions Response Area, construction personnel involved at the site should attend ordnance recognition and safety training.


Cleanup Ongoing

Cleanup Ongoing

Soil and Groundwater Contamination Program
Basewide Remedial Investigation Sites:
In 1990, the Army began further investigations into the nature and extent of on- and off-site soil and groundwater contamination, as well as any ecological or health threats that may be present. The investigation identified three waste disposal sites, firing ranges, and a vehicle maintenance area that require extensive cleanup actions. The Army completed all soil cleanup actions, and groundwater pump and treatment systems are operational. The action included remediating the Sites 2/12 maintenance/disposal area by soil excavation and ongoing groundwater remediation, Sites 16/17 disposal area by soil excavation, Site 31 disposal area by soil excavation, and Site 39 small arms ranges by soil excavation. Most of the excavated soils were placed at the Fort Ord Landfill before the Army placed cover material (a so-called "cap") over it in December 2002. The Army is currently conducting additional soil excavation at Site 39.

Fritzsche Army Airfield Practice Fire Area (Operable Unit 1):
An investigation into the nature and extent of contamination in the Fritzsche Army Airfield practice fire area began in 1984. The ROD was signed in September 1995. Groundwater cleanup standards were established in the ROD which must be met through the existing pump and treat system. The selected remedy is consistent with the initial action described above. The groundwater treatment system was installed in 1988. The Army continues to monitor the plume, while slightly expanding the system to address areas of contamination that have moved further down-gradient. Groundwater treatment systems located in the central and southern portions have significantly reduced the size of the Operable Unit 1 contaminant plume.

Fort Ord Landfill (Operable Unit 2):
The Army selected a remedy (ROD) in the fall of 1994 that included capping the landfill and installing a groundwater pump and treatment system. Construction of the groundwater treatment system is complete and is operational. In May 1995, the Army proposed to consolidate wastes from several areas around the main landfill which would provide more clean land for re-use. The changes are documented in the Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) in August 1996. The consolidation is complete and capping of the main landfill was completed in December 2002. The Army has installed an active landfill gas extraction and treatment system to capture and remediate methane and other volatile organic compound gases that are being generated by decaying materials in the landfill. The Army continues to monitor landfill gases to ensure that do not pose a health hazard.

Carbon Tetrachloride Plume Operable Unit:
The Army selected a remedy in 2008 for the site that included bioremediation and monitored natural attenuation for the groundwater. Currently, there is active remediation of the groundwater using lactate injection at the site.


Army Munitions and Explosives of Concern Program
Track 3 Sites:
Impact Area Munitions Response Site
The Army commenced the cleanup up action at the Impact Area with a prescribed burned per the requirements of the ROD. In December 2008, the Army conducted a prescribed burn for areas designated as Burn Unit 18 (137 acres) and Burn Unit 22 (72 acres) that is within the Site 39 Inland Range area. The purpose of the prescribed burn is to clear vegetation so munitions experts may safely remove munitions and explosives that remain within the former training range. The Army will be conducting surface and limited subsurface removal over next few months.

Interim ROD/Prescribed Burn:
An interim action ROD was signed in September 2002 to allow the Army to initiate cleanup actions at several ranges that contain extremely sensitive and dangerous munitions and explosives of concern (MEC) amidst thick vegetation that needs to be removed first so the MEC can be seen and cleared. Prescribed burns were selected as the safest method to clear vegetation, while also protecting special status plants. To minimize smoke impacts to the community, the Army has developed a specific set of meteorological conditions under which a burn would be conducted such that smoke will disperse. In addition, for the first burns conducted under this Interim Action, the Army offered temporary relocation to all residents of the county during the burns.

2003 Prescribed Burn:
The first prescribed burn took place on October 24, 2003. The burn was planned for 500 acres but escaped the initial boundaries and an additional 1000 acres was burned. The Army studied the October 2003 burn to understand what went right and what went wrong. As a result, the Army :

1) changed the burn prescription (decreased maximum wind gusts, etc.) to minimize the likelihood of escapes;
2) will not ignite the burn until burn prescription weather and fire fighting resource conditions are met;
3) increased the width of fuel breaks from 50 feet to 150 feet ;and
4) will try to keep the size of prescribed to 100 acres or less.

After the October 2003 burn, the Army cleared all munitions and explosives of concern from the surface of the entire burned area. A subsurface clearance was conducted in the 500 acre area of Ranges 43-48 per the interim action ROD with the exception of several so-called special case areas where MEC densities were so high that cleanup to depth would have been very costly, risky for workers and would have destroyed endangered maritime chaparral habitat.

2006 Prescribed Burn (Munitions Response Site 16):
With the lessons learned and the new burn prescription, the Army conducted the Munitions Response Site (MRS) 16 prescribed burn on October 19, 2006. The MRS 16 burn was conducted successfully with minimum impact from smoke to the surrounding communities.


2008 Prescribed Burn (Units 18 & 22): The Army conducted a prescribed burn at MR Site 18 and 22 on December 10, 2008. MRS Site 18 is 137 gross acres, with 88 acres burned. The adjacent site MRS 22 is 72 gross acres with 51 acres burned. From the lessons learned, a large buffer zone was created as part of the site preparations. Cleanup operations began shortly after the burn and are currently ongoing.

2009 Prescribed Burn (Units 14 & 19): A prescribed burn of 280 acres was conducted on Unit 14 on October 6-7, 2009. The Army also conducted a prescribed burn on 196 acres of Unit 19 on November 16, 2009. Cleanup activities began shortly after the burn and are currently ongoing.

2010 Prescribed Burn (Units 15 & 21): A prescribed burn of 277 acres was conducted on October 7 and October 8, 2011. MEC remediation is on-going.

2011 Prescribed Burn (Units 11&12): Planned prescribed burn for 2011 has been cancelled due to the unexpected encounters with two types of large artillery projectiles on the ground surface. These types of projectiles are generally found buried several feet into the ground. Because these items were found on the surface, they require a much greater safety setback distance than had been anticipated. This greater safety setback distance exceeds the Army's capabilities to conduct a safe prescribed burn. therefore the Army cancelled the planned prescribed burn. Instead, the Army will cut the vegetation in Units 11&12 first to allow the safe removal of unexploded ordnance in these areas. Once the surface unexploded ordnance has been removed from the areas and the vegetation grows back sufficiently to carry a fire, the areas will be burned to ensure successful recovery of the rare, fire-dependant chaparral habitat. Surface remediation of MEC is on-going.

2012 Prescribed Burn (Units 7 & 10): Planning documents to burn Units 7 & 10 have been finalized. However, only unit 10 will be burned in 2012 if weather conditions meet prescription burn conditions.


Privatized Munitions and Explosives of Concern Program

Interim Action Ranges Munitions Response Area:
FORA is completing the interim remedial action for Munitions Response Site Ranges 43-48 under the Army's Interim Action Record of Decision dated August 2002. On May 24, 2011, FORA submitted the final Phase II Interim Action Work Plan for the Interim Action Ranges Munitions Response Area to define the procedures, methods, and resources that will be used to collect additional data to determine where additional remedial action is warranted.

Cleanup Complete

Cleanup Complete Soil and Groundwater Contamination Program
Site 3 Beach Small Arms Firing Ranges:
Site 3 is situated within about 3.2 miles (780 acres) of dunes along the coastline of Monterey Bay at the western boundary of Fort Ord. Results of the investigation indicate lead from small arms is the main contaminant at the site. The site is also home of the Smith's Blue butterfly, an endangered species, and buckwheat plants which the butterflies use to lay their eggs on. In 1997, the Army completed a ROD allowing them to first clean up the lead contamination to address human health concerns by soil excavation and placement in the Fort Ord Landfill, which was simultaneously being remediated (capped). This cleanup was completed in 2000, with the dunes being re-contoured and re-vegetated. The Army completed a subsequent post-cleanup ecological risk assessment which showed that the initial cleanup is protective of ecological species as well. This property has been transferred to the State of California. In 2009, the State opened the Fort Ord Dunes State Park.

Army Munitions and Explosives of Concern Program
Interim Actions:
MRS-16:
After the successful burn of the vegetation, cleanup began on the former anti-tank rocket range. All items visible on the surface was removed and metal detectors was used to identify near surface metal objects. Work was briefly halted in May 2008 to allow the flowering period of two protected plant species (Sand Gila and Monterey Spineflower). After the flowering period, work began again and was completed in June 2008.

Track 2 Sites:
Parker Flats Munitions Response Site Record of Decision:
The Army completed and implemented the Land Use Control Implementation Plan for the 600 Parker Flats site as required by the ROD. EPA determined all remediation actions are completed at this site on July 27, 2009. A portion of the site will be the future home of the Central Coast Veterans Cemetery. in July 2009.
Del Rey Oaks Munitions Response Site Record of Decision:
The Army completed and implemented the Land Use Control Implementation Plan for the 272 acres Del Rey Oaks site as required by the ROD. EPA determined all remedial actions are completed at this site on August 20, 2010.

Track 3 Sites:
MRS-BLM Units 14 and 19: Field work for the units was completed in July 2011. The Remediation Action Report was finalized in December 2011. A total of 213 MEC items were removed, along with 189,150 pounds of MD (munitions debris) and 7, 525 pounds of range debris.

Privatized Munitions and Explosives of Concern Program
County North Munitions Response Area:
On July 28, 2011, EPA determined that all remedial actions have been completed at the County North Munitions Response Area.

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Cleanup Results to Date

The continuing operation of the groundwater treatment systems at the former fire practice area, the Landfill, and the Site 2/12 area, the capping of the landfill and removal and treatment of landfill gas, successful completion of a pilot soil vapor extraction system for volatile organic compounds in the vadose zone above the carbon tetrachloride plume, and the removal of soil and debris have reduced the potential of exposure to contaminants.


Munitions and explosives of concern (MEC) removal actions, fencing, warning signs, and patrols have further reduced exposure to MEC.

Property Transfer Status:
As of May 2011, the Army has transferred over 19,280 acres out of 27,827. Of the 19,200 plus acres transferred, 7,212 acres went to the Bureau of Land Management. The other major recipient of Fort Ord property has been the California State University (CSU) system and the Fort Ord Reuse Authority. The CSU Monterey campus is located on the site of the former Fort Ord and continues to expand.
Fort Ord Reuse Authority received these properties through early transfer and is responsible for the cleanup of these portions of Fort Ord. Cleanup activities are not affected by base closure activities, except to the extent that they are being accelerated to facilitate more rapid land transfers.

The Army plans to retain 812 acres of Fort Ord's 27,827 acres.

The groundwater treatment systems at the former fire practice area, the Landfill, and the Site 2/12 area, the capping of the landfill and removal and treatment of landfill gas, successful completion of a pilot soil vapor extraction system for volatile organic compounds in the vadose zone above the carbon tetrachloride plume, and the removal of soil and debris have reduced the potential of exposure to contaminants. Munitions and explosives of concern (MEC) removal actions, fencing, warning signs, and patrols have further reduced exposure to MEC. Contaminated groundwater is not being used for drinking water.

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Potentially Responsible Parties


Potentially responsible parties (PRPs) refers to companies that are potentially responsible for generating, transporting, or disposing of the hazardous waste found at the site.


The US Army is the PRP for Fort Ord.

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Documents and Reports


Hide details for Community InvolvementCommunity Involvement
09/13/13FinalTechnical Assistance Needs Report
09/13/13Fort Ord Technical Assistance Needs Assessment Public Meeting Flyer
03/14/14TASC Invite to 4-7-14 Open Community Workshop About the Draft Prescribed Burn After-Action Report
04/07/14TASC fact sheet summary of Fort Ord Prescribed Burn 2013 After-Action Report
04/07/14TASC Presentation to Ford Ord community on Prescribed Burn 2013 After-Action Report
04/07/14TASC Technical Review of Fort Ord Prescribed Burn 2013 After-Action Report
Hide details for Legal DocumentsLegal Documents
11/19/90Federal Facility Agreement Under CERCLA Section 120
04/11/00Strategic Management, Analysis, Requirements And Technology Team (SMART) Operable Units For Ordnance And Explosives FFA Agreement
07/25/07Federal Facility Agreement Under CERCLA Section 120 Amendment No. 1
01/26/10Federal Facility Agreement Schedule for Interim Action Munitions Response Remedial Design/Remedial Action
01/26/10Federal Facility Agreement Schedule for Munitions Response Track 2 Parker Flats (parcels F2.6, L2.3 and L2.4.1) - Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plans
01/26/10Federal Facility Agreement Schedule for Operable Unit 2
01/26/10Federal Facility Agreement Schedule for Operable Unit Carbon Tetrachloride Plume
01/26/10Federal Facility Agreement Schedule for Site 3
06/15/10Federal Facility Agreement Schedule for Operable Unit 1
06/28/10Federal Facility Agreement Schedule for Munitions Response Track 2 Del Rey Oaks Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
11/09/10Federal Facility Agreement Schedule for Remedial Investigation Site 39
01/13/11Federal Facility Agreement Schedules for Track 3 Impact Area Munitions Response Area and Remaining Investigation/Feasibility Study Munitions Response Area
Hide details for Records of DecisionRecords of Decision
02/06/08Record of Decision for Operable Unit Carbon Tetrachloride Plume
05/15/08Record of Decision for Track 3, Impact Area Munitions Response
Area
08/26/08Record of Decision for Track 2, Parker Flats Munitions Response Area
11/21/08Record of Decision for Track 2, Del Rey Oaks Munitions Response Area
09/30/09Record of Decision Amendment for Basewide, Site 39 Inland Ranges
Draft Final Five-year Review Report, First Five-Year Review Report for Fort Ord Superfund Site, Monterey, CA
Landfill ESD (1/1997)
Landfill ROD (8/1994)
No Action Soils ROD (4/1995)
OE Track 0 ESD (4/2005)
OE Track 0 ROD (7/2002)
OE Track 1 ROD (4/2005)
OE Track 2 ROD (9/2002)
Overall Site ESD (12/2003)
Overall Site ROD (1/1997)
Site 3 Beach Range ROD (1/1997)
Surface Soils ROD (3/1994)
Hide details for Technical DocumentsTechnical Documents
09/20/02First Five Year Review Report
09/25/07Second Five Year Review Report
09/25/12Third Five Year Review Report

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Community Involvement

Public Meetings: The Army holds quarterly Community Involvement Workshops to keep the public up-to-date on progress at the site.

The Fort Ord Reuse Authority holds regular community out reach events to keep the public up to date on progress of the privatized cleanup.

Public Meeting Schedules:
US Army Meeting Schedule
Fort Ord Reuse Authority Community Outreach Event Schedule

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Public Information Repositories

The public information repositories for the site are at the following locations:

Fort Ord Administrative Record
Building 4463
Gigling Road, Room 101
Ord Military Community, CA 93944-5004
831-393-9186

Seaside Branch Library
550 Harcourt Avenue
Seaside, CA 93955
831-899-2537

Tanimura and Antle Family Memorial Library
California State University - Monterey Bay
Divarty Road
Seaside, CA

The most complete collection of documents is the official EPA site file, maintained at the following location:

Superfund Records Center

Mail Stop SFD-7C

95 Hawthorne Street, Room 403

San Francisco, CA 94105

(415) 820-4700

Enter main lobby of 75 Hawthorne street, go to 4th floor of South Wing Annex.

Additional Links

All documents referenced above can be found on Fort Ord’s Administrative Record.

    For instructions on how to access and search the Administrative Record please double click on the file below.

    Administrative Record Search Instructions [Compatibility Mode].pdf

    The Army maintains a web site (http://www.fortordcleanup.com) that contains valuable site information, including all fact sheets, newsletters and announcements of upcoming Community Involvement Workshops.

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Contacts

EPA Site Manager
Martin Hausladen: Non-munitions related issues
Judy Huang: Privatized cleanup, Parker Flats, and Del Rey Oaks related issues

Lewis Mitani:
Army retained munitions related issues
Mr. Martin Hausladen:
(415) 972-3007

Ms. Judy Huang:
(415) 972-3681

Mr. Lewis Mitani:
(415) 972-3032
Mr. Hausladen:
hausladen.martin@epa.gov

Ms. Judy Huang:
huang.judy@epa.gov

Mr. Lewis Mitani:
mitani.lewis@epa.gov
US EPA
75 Hawthorne Street, SFD-8-3
San Francisco, CA 94105
EPA Community Involvement Coordinator
Viola Cooper
(415) 972-3243 or toll free message line at 1-800-231-3075
cooper.viola@epa.gov
75 Hawthorne Street, SFD-6-3
San Francisco, CA 94105
EPA Public Information Center
(415) 947-8701
State Contact

Franklin Mark
California Department of Toxic Substances Control
For soil and groundwater related issues
Ed Walker
California Department of Toxic Substances Control
For munitions related issues
Grant Himebaugh
Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board

916-255-3584






916-255-4988





805-542-4636

fmark@dtsc.ca.gov





ewalker@dtsc.ca.gov





ghimebaugh@waterboards.ca.gov

California Department of Toxic Substances Control
8800 Cal Center Drive
Sacramento, CA 95826


California Department of Toxic Substances Control
8800 Cal Center Drive
Sacramento, CA 95826


Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board
895 Aerovista Place, Suite 101
San Luis Obispo, CA. 93401-7906
PRP Contact
William Collins
Department of the Army For Ord Base Realignment and closure Office
831-242-7920
William.k.collins.civ@mail.mil
Department of the Army
Fort Ord Base Realignment and Closure Office
P.O. Box 5008
Monterey, CA 93944-5008
Community Contact
Other Contacts
Stan Cook
Fort Ord Reuse Authority
831-883-8672
stan@fora.org
Fort Ord Reuse Authority
100 12th Street, Building 2880
Marina, CA 93933
After Hours (Emergency Response)
US EPA
(800) 424-8802

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