Submit Resource


How do I submit my resource to be included in the Clearinghouse?
What you need to do
What EPA will do
What is the difference between Environmental Education and Environmental Information?
How long will it take?
Other FAQs

How do I submit my resource to be included in the Clearinghouse?

What you need to do: Depending on the type of resource you are submitting, you may have to send the resource itself, or simply a description. All submissions should be sent to:

1) If your resource fits into one of the following categories, please MAIL one copy* of the resource, a brief letter requesting it be added to the Clearinghouse, and a copy of the online form:

U.S. EPA Region 10
Public Resource Center EXA-124
1200 6th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101

2) If your resource fits into one of the following categories, please send a brief letter requesting it be added to the Clearinghouse, and a copy of the online form. You may mail this to the above address, fax it to 206-553-0149, or email it to: mailto:epa-seattle@epa.gov :
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What EPA will do:

1) We will review your resource and categorize it as either an environmental education resource or an environmental information resource . Please be sure you include enough information about your resource to allow us to do this review. In the event that your resource does not fit either category, we will try to refer you to a database that is more appropriate for your resource.

2) We will enter your resource information and organizational information into the Clearinghouse.

* Your resource will not be returned to you
** Including an email address in your contact information will allow users to contact you with an on-line resource request directly from the Clearinghouse

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What is the difference between Environmental Education and Environmental Information? Top

A resource that presents useful, relevant data or background information about the environment and/or about an environmental issue will be classified as environmental information. Examples of this type of resource are an article that explains the energy exchanges that take place within a forest ecosystem, a poster that outlines the life-cycle of wild salmon, or a video that explains the geology behind volcanic eruptions. A field guide would fall into this category, as would a GIS map outlining current land-use practices in the subwatersheds within the Columbia Basin. We require that the environmental information resources included in the Clearinghouse be factual and up-to-date.

A resource that goes beyond purveying background information and includes opportunities for users to enhance their critical and creative thinking skills and/or problem-solving skills will be classified as environmental education. Environmental education teaches individuals to weigh various components of an environmental issue and encourages informed and responsible decision making. It does not advocate a particular viewpoint or course of action.

Examples of this type of resource are an activity that explains the energy exchanges that take place within a forest ecosystem and asks students to create and test hypotheses dealing with changing variables in the system, a poster that in addition to outlining the life-cycle of wild salmon encourages students to examine the scientific and social consequences of either constructing or breeching a dam on a salmon waterway, or a video that explains the geology behind volcanic eruptions and asks students to devise an emergency preparedness plan for a community located in the shadow of a volcano. A watershed curriculum that encourages students to collect and analyze local stream data would fall into this category, as would an interactive CD-Rom program that allows users to test competing land-use scenarios for economic and environmental advantages.

In addition to requiring that the environmental education resources included in the Clearinghouse be factual and up-to-date, we also require that they present a balanced treatment of differing viewpoints when appropriate, that they focus on concepts presented in context, and that they build thinking skills and apply those skills to specific and/or novel issues and situations. We also look for a high level of instructional soundness indicated by: learner-centered instructional methods, interactive instructional methods, connectedness to learners’ everyday lives, an incorporation of expanded learning environments and learning styles, interdisciplinary work, and meaningful assessments.

For more information concerning world-wide standards for quality environmental education materials, curricula, and training, please visit the North American Association for Environmental Education’s Project for Excellence in EE

In addition to the Tbilisi definition, we apply the standards set by the Environmental Education Guidelines for Excellence. These guidelines were developed by the North American Association of Environmental Education in cooperation with universities, departments of education, industry representatives, non-profit organizations, government representatives, scientists, teachers, and administrators from across North America. The Guidelines articulate six characteristics of high quality environmental education resources:

Fairness and Accuracy
• factual accuracy
• balanced presentation of differing viewpoints
• openness to inquiry
• reflection of diversity

Depth
• awareness
• focus on concepts
• concepts in context
• attention to different scales

Emphasis on Skills Building -- EE resources enable learners to prevent and address issues
• critical and creative thinking
• applying skills to issues
• action skills

Action Orientation -- EE resources promote civic responsibility
• sense of personal stake and responsibility
• self-efficacy

Instructional Soundness -- EE resources use techniques that create an effective learning environment
• learner-centered instruction
• different ways of learning
• connection to learners’ everyday lives
• expanded learning environment
• interdisciplinary
• goals and objectives
• appropriateness for specific learning settings
• assessment

Usability -- EE resources are well-designed and easy to use
• clarity and logic
• easy to use
• long-lived
• adaptable
• accompanied by instruction and support
• fit with national, state, or local requirements

We recognize that there are many educational resources that do not adhere to these definitions and guidelines, but that are still of great value to educators and citizens and still further our goal of helping educators and citizens teach and learn about the environment. Resources which present useful, relevant data or background information about the environment and environmental issues is therefore categorized as “environmental information”. We do review environmental information resources for factual accuracy.

How long will it take to add my resource? Top

We will contact you regarding the status of your resource in the Clearinghouse. For time-critical resources such as conferences and workshops, you can expect to be contacted within a week after we receive your request materials. For written and other tangible resources, inclusion in the Clearinghouse may take up to one month.

Other FAQs Top

Why does EPA need a copy of my resource?
We use the copy you submit to review your resource and categorize it either as an environmental education resource or an environmental information resource.

What happens to my resource after it is reviewed and entered in the Clearinghouse?
We maintain a file on your organization and the resources you have listed in the Clearinghouse. This allows us to answer questions about the contents of the Clearinghouse in an accurate and timely fashion.

What happens when the resource is no longer available from my organization?
When the resource you have submitted is no longer available from your organization, and you therefore do not want to continue receiving requests, please contact us by mail, phone, fax, or email and request that we remove the resource from the Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse provides a prompt to our database manager to update any given resource entry six months after it is entered and every six months from that point on.

Does it cost anything to add my resource to the Clearinghouse?
No! Shipping one copy of your resource to EPA is the only cost you will incur. The Clearinghouse has been designed as a free information gathering service for the educators, parents, and citizens of Region 10 and beyond.

What can I do if I do not agree with EPA’s categorization of my resource or with EPA’s decision to not include my resource in the Clearinghouse?
The Clearinghouse was developed to provide the citizens of Region 10 with a central and easily accessible place to go to locate quality environmental education and information resources. We must limit the resources included in the Clearinghouse to those that fulfill this purpose. If your resource is not a good fit for the Clearinghouse, we will attempt to refer you to another database.

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