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Note: This information is provided for reference purposes only. Although the information provided here was accurate and current when first created, it is now outdated.

Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide


THALLOUS CARBONATE
6533-73-9

This guide should not be construed to authorize emergency personnel to perform the procedures or activities indicated or implied. Care of persons exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized authority.

SUBSTANCE CHARACTERISTICS:

Pure Form:Heavy, shiny, colorless white crystals.
Odor:
Commercial Forms:
Use:Fungicide, manufacture of imitation diamonds, chemistry reagent.
Other Names:Carbonic acid, dithallium salt; dithallium carbonate; thallium carbonate.
Personal Protective Equipment:See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


EMERGENCY LIFE-SUPPORT EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES THAT MAY BE REQUIRED:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, water, syrup of Ipecac, activated charcoal, saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate. THALLOUS CARBONATE


SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Warning: Effects may be delayed. Caution is advised. Signs and symptoms of acute exposure to thallous carbonate may be severe and include bronchitis, pneumonia, and respiratory paralysis. Tachycardia (rapid heart rate) may occur. Victims may experience headache, delirium, dementia, depression, psychosis, and peripheral burning sensations with severe pain. Muscle weakness, ptosis (drooping eyelids), strabismus (loss of coordination between eyes), incoordination, spasmodic movements, convulsions, seizures, shock, and coma may also occur. Gastrointestinal effects include increased salivation, inflammation of the oral cavity, anorexia, vomiting (may be bloody), diarrhea (may be bloody), abdominal pain, and constipation. Kidney damage has been reported.


EMERGENCY LIFE-SUPPORT PROCEDURES:

Acute exposure to thallous carbonate may require decontamination and life support for the victims. Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing appropriate to the type and degree of contamination. Air-purifying or supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary. Rescue vehicles should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.


INHALATION EXPOSURE:

1. Move victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure to thallous carbonate. 2. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or other respiratory support. 3. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures. 4. Transport to a health care facility. THALLOUS CARBONATE

DERMAL/EYE EXPOSURE:

1. Remove victims from exposure. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure to thallous carbonate. 2. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or other respiratory support. 3. Remove and isolate contaminated clothing as soon as possible. 4. If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for at least 15 minutes. 5. Wash exposed skin areas thoroughly with water. 6. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures. 7. Transport to a health care facility.

INGESTION EXPOSURE:

1. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or other respiratory support. 2. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures. 3. Vomiting may be induced with syrup of Ipecac. If elapsed time since ingestion of thallous carbonate is unknown or suspected to be greater than 30 minutes, do not induce vomiting and proceed to Step 4. Ipecac should not be administered to children under 6 months of age. Warning: Ingestion of thallous carbonate may result in sudden onset of seizures or loss of consciousness. Syrup of Ipecac should be administered only if victims are alert, have an active gag-reflex, and show no signs THALLOUS CARBONATE of impending seizure or coma. If ANY uncertainty exists, proceed to Step 4. The following dosages of Ipecac are recommended: children up to 1 year old, 10 mL (1/3 oz); children 1 to 12 years old, 15 mL (1/2 oz); adults, 30 mL (1 oz). Ambulate (walk) the victims and give large quantities of water. If vomiting has not occurred after 15 minutes, Ipecac may be readministered. Continue to ambulate and give water to the victims. If vomiting has not occurred within 15 minutes after second administration of Ipecac, administer activated charcoal. 4. Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert. Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1 cup) of water. 5. Promote excretion by administering a saline cathartic or sorbitol to conscious and alert victims. Children require 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) of cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults. 6. Transport to a health care facility.

 

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