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Show details for Air Emissions (RCRA)Air Emissions (RCRA)
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Show details for Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generators (CESQG)Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generators (CESQG)
Hide details for Construction and Demolition WastesConstruction and Demolition Wastes
03/01/2009Estimating 2003 Building-Related Construction and Demolition Materials AmountsPublication
 Description: This document presents the amount of building-related construction and demolition (C&D) materials generated and recovered in the United States during 2003, updating the findings of the 1998 EPA report Characterization of Building-Related Construction and Demolition Debris in the United States (EPA 530-R-98-010). Limited information is available on the amount of C&D materials generated and managed in the United States. The methodology used in this report to estimate the amount of building-related C&D materials generated and recovered during 2003 is based on national statistical data and typical waste generation during building construction, renovation, demolition, or maintenance activities. The recovery estimate relies on 2003 data reported by state environmental agencies.
 
06/01/2008Construction InitiativePublication
 Description: This document discusses EPA's Construction Initiative (CI), a collaborative, public-private sector effort to increase the recycling and reuse of industrial materials in building and transportation construction projects. The Initiative increases awareness of the potential value and unique abilities of these materials to replace virgin materials in numerous construction applications.
 
03/01/2008Environmental Fact Sheet: EPA Helps Communities Plan Ahead for Natural DisastersPublication
 Description: This fact sheet discusses the guidance document Planning for Natural Disaster Debris (EPA530-K-08-001), which helps communities prepare to clean up after natural disasters and manage disaster debris.
 
03/01/2008Planning for Natural Disaster DebrisPublication
 Description: This guidance document discusses the management of debris from natural disasters, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, tornados, floods, wildfires, and winter storms. This document can help a planner begin the planning process or revise an existing disaster debris management plan and it provides planners with more awareness for environmental protectiveness when it comes to dealing with disaster debris.
 
06/01/2006Tribal Waste Journal: Construction and Demolition Materials: Concrete Reasons to Manage Them NowPublication
 Description: This issue of the Tribal Waste Journal discusses ways for tribal environmental managers to prevent illegal dumping of construction and demolition (C&D) materials; save money on disposal costs of these heavy, bulky materials; and maintain clean lands.
 
03/23/2005USE OF RECYCLED MATERIAL IN HOME CONSTRUCTIONMemo
 Description: The EPA lacks the statutory authority to require the use of recovered materials by the home construction industry in its manufacture of house siding and other construction mateirals or to require recycling of such materials. States, communities, and industry have developed voluntary approaches to reduce, reuse, and recycle construction materials.
 
09/01/2004RCRA in Focus: Construction, Demolition, and RenovationPublication
 Description: This document discusses the regulatory status of construction and demolition (C&D) waste and ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle C&D waste. Most C&D debris is nonhazardous and is not regulated by EPA. However, many states have specific definitions of C&D debris that effectively determine what materials are allowed to be disposed of in nonhazardous waste landfills, C&D landfills, or incinerators. Although EPA does not regulate most C&D waste, they encourage efforts to keep the hazardous components of C&D waste out of landfills to conserve natural resources and protect human health and the environment.
 
06/01/2000Building Savings: Strategies for Waste Reduction of Construction and Demolition Debris from Buildings Publication
 Description: This fact sheet packet is aimed at local governments that want to encourage more building-related construction and demolition debris recovery, building owners and developers interested in green building design and building contractors seeking a competitive edge.
 
12/01/1998Environmental Fact Sheet: Proposed Rule on the Management and Disposal of Lead-Based Paint DebrisPublication
 Description: This fact sheet summarizes the proposal to suspend current hazardous waste management requirements for lead-based paint debris. The document explains why this rule is needed, who is subject to the rule, and how people performing work in their homes are affected.
 
06/01/1998Characterization of Building Related Construction and Demolition Debris in the U.S.Publication
 Description: This document characterizes the quantity and composition of building-related C&D debris generated in the U.S.; summarizes the waste management practices for this waste stream; focuses on building-related wastes, including construction, demolition, and renovation of residential and nonresidential buildings. It also briefly addresses road and bridge debris and land clearing debris. Finally, it discusses the generation and management of C&D debris in the U.S. Appendices contain calculations, state definitions for C&D debris, and typical C&D debris constituents. Includes tables, figures, and bibliography.
 
03/01/1998Reusable News (Spring/Summer 1998)Publication
 Description: This issue of Reusable News discusses the recent ""Recycling: Looking Toward the Next Century"" brainstorming workshop, the current national recycling rate, the New Ronald Reagan Building, the Building-Related Construction and Demolition Characterization Report, and also contains an insert, the current OSW Publications List.
 
03/12/1997RCRA APPLICABILITY TO PAINT REMOVAL WASTESMemo
 Description: The paint removal process is not subject to regulation in some circumstances. Waste determination under Section 262.11 is made once the combination of paint and surface preparation product is removed from the surface of the structure. Each product user is responsible for waste determination. Nonhazardous waste which subsequently becomes hazardous is subject to regulation. Generators are potentially liable under CERCLA for damage caused by a release. A lead-based paint abatement contractor and building owner are both generators (cogenerators).
 
08/10/1995GENERATOR STATUS OF CONTRACTORS WHO REMOVE LEAD-BASED PAINTMemo
 Description: During typical lead-based paint abatement, both the property owner and contractor may qualify as generators responsible for compliance. The cogenerator policy applies to cases other than those specified in the 10/30/80 Federal Register (45 FR 72024), where waste is generated by more than one party.
 
03/07/1995APPLICABILITY OF THE HOUSEHOLD WASTE EXCLUSION TO LEAD-CONTAMINATED SOILMemo
 Description: Lead-contaminated soil at a residence is exempt household hazardous waste (HHW) if it is the result of routine stripping and painting or natural weathering of lead-based paint (LBP). LBP chips from stripping and repainting of residence walls by an owner or contractor are HHW. Construction, renovation, or demolition debris is not HHW (SUPERSEDED: See RPC# 7/31/00-01). Waste generated by home health care providers may be HHW. Media and debris contaminated by residential heating oil tanks are household hazardous waste (HHW). Covering residential soil containing hazardous waste with sod, mulch, or gravel does not constitute generation, treatment, or disposal of hazardous waste and triggers no Subtitle C obligations. HHW mixed with a regulated hazardous waste is subject to Subtitle C regulation. The Subtitle D regulations (Part 257 open dumping rules and Part 258 municipal solid waste landfill regulations) may not apply to household waste disposed on residential property.
 
02/28/1995DO RCRA REQUIREMENTS APPLY TO THE HANDLING, SHIPMENT AND DISPOSAL OF HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE COMPONENTS?Memo
 Description: Household hazardous waste (HHW) must be generated on the premises and composed primarily of materials generated by consumers in their homes. Contractor-generated waste is exempt if it is from routine residential maintenance.
 
02/15/1995Construction and Demolition Waste LandfillsPublication
 Description: Presents information on construction and demolition (C&D) waste landfills. Discusses the composition of C&D wastes, including any hazardous materials or constituents. Provides information on the quality of C&D landfill leachate, based on sampling data taken from landfills around the country. Contains a detailed summary of state regulations pertaining to C&D facilities. Identifies states that have regulations related to groundwater monitoring; corrective action; location restrictions; and facility design, operation, closure, and/or postclosure care; and provides the specifics of those regulations.
 
01/01/1995Reusable News (Winter 1995)Publication
 Description: This issue of Reusable News reports on municipal solid waste (MSW) generation and recovery rate, features an interview with the Federal Environmental Executive, and includes articles on Washington State's ""buy recycled"" campaign, construction and demolition waste reduction, and EPA's Source Reduction Mega Match program. This issue also includes an insert listing EPA publications on MSW.
 
10/07/1994PROCESSING LEAD ABATEMENT DEBRIS TO MEET HAZARDOUS WASTE RECYCLER'S SPECIFICATIONS IS NOT ""TREATMENT"" AS DEFINED IN 40 CFR 260.10Memo
 Description: Processing (cutting, chopping, shredding, or grinding) of lead-based paint (LBP) waste is treatment, but it is not subject to regulation if it is part of legitimate recycling. The storage of hazardous waste lead-based paint before or after exempt processing is regulated. Recycling is an exempt form of hazardous waste treatment.
 
09/30/1994List of Industrial Waste Landfills and Construction and Demolition Waste LandfillsPublication
 Description: Provides an estimate of the number of industrial and construction and demolition (C&D) waste landfills in the United States. Presents state summaries, including number of facilities; date of data; list of additional data available from the state list; and the name, address, and telephone number of the contact who provided the information. Contains the state lists of active industrial and C&D waste landfills, sorted by county, city, and name.
 
06/03/1994CLARIFICATION OF RCRA REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO HAZARDOUS DEBRISMemo
 Description: Removing contaminants from an intact building is waste generation, not treatment. An intact building is not considered discarded until it is destroyed. The removed material is eligible for the land disposal restrictions (LDR) 268.45 debris treatment standards if it meets the definition of debris.
 
05/24/1994STATUS OF WASTES GENERATED FROM ABATEMENT OF LEAD-BASED PAINTMemo
 Description: Lead-based paint (LBP) abatement wastes are not household hazardous waste (HHW) if generated in construction, demolition, or renovation, but are exempt HHW if generated in routine residential maintenance (SUPERSEDED: See 63 FR 70233, 70241; 12/18/98). EPA does not distinguish between wastes generated by homeowners and contractors (SEE ALSO: RPC# 3/7/95-01). Unless it is HHW, LBP abatement waste exhibiting the toxicity characteristic for lead (D008) is currently regulated under Subtitle C. EPA may amend RCRA Subtitle C rules to remove the disincentives to abate LBP.
 
06/15/1993Engineering and Environmental Aspects of Recycled Materials for Highway ConstructionPublication
 Description: Evaluates the environmental aspects and engineering factors related to the utilization of recycled materials in highway construction. Presents an overview and assessment of different technologies, processes, and methods of recycling various materials into highway appurtenances and for highway construction with consideration of environmental and health risks. Includes bibliography. Appendix to Report to Congress: A Study of the Use of Recycled Paving Material.
 
04/19/1993DISCUSSION PAPER ON POSSIBLE UNIVERSAL WASTEMemo
 Description: EPA is evaluating the applicability of the household hazardous waste (HHW) exclusion to lead-based paint abatement wastes (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 70233, 70241; 12/18/98). Part 279 prohibits the storage of used oil in unlined surface impoundments and applying used oil to roads. Fluorescent bulbs may be conditionally exempt in the future. EPA does not believe that F001-F005 solvents should be included as universal wastes. EPA is currently studying other solvent wastes to determine if they merit a listing (SEE ALSO: 61 FR 42318; 8/14/96). Spent antifreeze may exhibit the toxicity characteristic for lead and/or benzene. EPA is evaluating toxicity characteristic levels for lead and pentachlorophenol (PCP). New MCLs could affect future toxicity characteristic levels. Sandblast grit from the removal of lead-based paint may be D008.
 
09/16/1992RCRA STATUS OF LEAD-BASED PAINT ABATEMENT DEBRIS AND LEAD PAINT CONTAINING DEMOLITION DEBRISMemo
 Description: Revising the toxicity characteristic levels for lead based on groundwater modeling, rather than extraction procedure levels, would result in most lead-based paint abatement wastes no longer testing hazardous. The revision of the toxicity characteristic level for lead may occur as part of Hazardous Waste Identification Rule. EPA considered extending the household hazardous waste exclusion to lead-based paint (LBP) abatement wastes from renovation (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 70233, 70241; 12/18/98).
 
06/11/1992CLARIFICATION OF THE APPLICABILITY OF CERTAIN RCRA REQUIREMENTS TO COMMON EXCAVATION-TYPE ACTIVITIESMemo
 Description: Excavating and redepositing hazardous soils (active management) within an area of contamination (AOC) during trenching or other non-RCRA related construction is not generation, treatment, storage, or disposal of hazardous waste and triggers no RCRA requirements, including land disposal restrictions (LDR) and generator rules. Such excavation does not “generate” waste and is not subject to generator requirements (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 28556, 28617; 5/26/98).
 
08/30/1991LEAD PAINT REMOVAL DEBRIS AND THE TCLP PROCEDUREMemo
 Description: Adding iron or other material to lead-based paint (LBP) removal waste (or to removal abrasive) to mask the lead (D008) characteristic is not legitimate and may subject the generator to additional liability. Whether the masking agent is added to the paint removal abrasive prior to the abatement process or added to the waste following generation is immaterial (SEE ALSO: RPC# 7/3/91-02).
 
07/03/1991TCLP AND LEAD PAINT REMOVAL DEBRISMemo
 Description: Provides general guidance for the representative sampling of lead-based paint abatement wastes (debris and abrasives) from drums, roll off boxes, and other containers. Shipments of LBP abatement wastes from a field site (bridge repair) to a central accumulation point must generally be accompanied by a manifest. The central accumulation point must be a transfer facility or a TSDF to accept manifested hazardous waste. Generators conducting lead-based paint (LBP) abatement must test the wastes using TCLP unless they can apply knowledge to determine characteristics (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 70233, 70241; 12/18/98). If an LBP waste first tests nonhazardous in TCLP due to the masking effect of an iron abrasive but exhibits the characteristic prior to disposal, all hazardous waste regulations apply. LBP abatement wastes that are characteristic for lead may be stabilized on site during accumulation in tanks or containers without a permit.
 
07/15/1990Environmental Fact Sheet: Agency Releases Report to Congress on Special Wastes from Mineral ProcessingPublication
 Description: This fact sheet presents the EPA Report to Congress regarding 20 mineral processing wastes generated by 91 facilities in 29 states. The report characterizes and presents finding for each waste and solicits comments on findings. The Agency proposes to ban elemental phosphorus slag in construction and/or land reclamation because of radioactivity levels.
 
03/01/1990APPLICABILITY OF THE HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE EXCLUSION TO WASTE GENERATED BY CONTRACTORSQuestion & Answer
 Description: Discusses two criteria for the household hazardous waste (HHW) exclusion. Construction, renovation, and demolition waste generated at household would not qualify for HHW exclusion (SUPERSEDED: see RPC# 7/31/00-01). There is no distinction between HHW generated by a homeowner and HHW generated at home by a contractor. Waste generated as part of routine residential maintenance by contractor is exempt HHW (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 70233, 70241; December 18, 1998).
 
11/20/1987LEAD-BASED PAINT RESIDUES AND CONTAMINATED SOILSMemo
 Description: Paint wastes are exempt household hazardous wastes (HHW) if they are generated by homeowners and not by contractors (SUPERSEDED: RPC# 3/1/90-06). HHW from federal agencies is not HHW. Certain material and soil contaminated with weathering lead based paint is characteristic for lead. If characteristic soil is actively managed, it is a hazardous waste. Discusses lead paint remediation methods (SEE ALSO: RPC# 3/7/95-01). A property owner is normally not required to characterize soil left on site. Addresses factors in determining if soil removal is required. On-site soil treatment needs a permit unless the generator is exempt (SEE ALSO: 61 FR 18779; 4/29/96).
 
05/01/1984ACTIVITIES THAT AREN’T CONSTRUCTION ARE ALLOWED PRIOR TO PERMIT ISSUANCEQuestion & Answer
 Description: Grading, grubbing, building access roads, soil testing, fencing, and earth movement are not construction. Activities that are not directly related to a hazardous waste facility or unit are allowed prior to permit issuance.
 
Show details for ContainersContainers
Show details for Containment BuildingsContainment Buildings
Show details for Corrective Action (RCRA)Corrective Action (RCRA)
Show details for Corrosive WastesCorrosive Wastes
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Show details for (Not Categorized)(Not Categorized)
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