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Regulatory Development and Retrospective Review Tracker

Residential Lead Dust Hazard Standards

a.k.a. Residential Lead Dust Hazard Standards


RIN: 2070-AJ82 (What's this?)

Docket No.: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2009-0665 (What's this?)

Current Phase: Pre-Proposal (What's this?)

Abstract:
EPA is reviewing existing regulatory dust lead hazard standards for residential buildings and Child Occupied Facilities (COFs). On January 5, 2001, the EPA issued a final regulation under sections 403 and 402(c)(3) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The 2001 final rule established regulatory dust lead hazard standards of 40 g/ft2 for floors and 250 g/ft2 for interior window sills.

The rule also established clearance levels for dust following an abatement of 40 g/ft2 for floors, 250 g/ft2 for interior window sills and 400 g/ft2 in window troughs. On August 10, 2009, EPA received a petition requesting that EPA take action to lower EPA's regulatory lead hazard standards for lead in dust. On October 22, 2009, EPA granted the request. Additionally, since the 2001 final rule, EPA has assessed new data regarding lead and lead dust. Because new data has become available and EPA is developing an integrated science assessment of lead as part of a new review of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for lead, the Agency's review of the existing lead dust hazard and clearance levels for target housing and COFs should reflect this new information in order to maintain consistency within the Agency. Currently, there are no lead based paint hazard standards for the interiors of public and commercial buildings. EPA will consider the development of a hazard standard for public and commercial buildings in a separate rulemaking.
Timeline

MilestoneDate
Initiated09/08/2010
NPRM: Published in FR00/0000 (projected)

Potential Effects

Children's Health
This rule is likely to address an adverse impact on childhood lifestages, including prenatal (via exposure to women of childbearing age). The potential adverse impacts are expected to be due to exposure (i.e., children and/or women of childbearing age are more likely to be highly exposed than other lifestages).

Environmental Justice
This rulemaking involves a topic that is likely to be of particular interest to or have particular impact upon minority, low-income, tribal, and/or other vulnerable populations because:

  • This topic is likely to impact the health of vulnerable populations.
  • This topic is likely to impact the environmental conditions of vulnerable populations.
  • This topic is likely to present an opportunity to address an existing disproportionate impact on vulnerable populations.

Federal Government - other agencies
Likely to be involved in the implementation of this rule.

State Governments
Likely to be involved in the implementation of this rule.

Tribal Governments
Likely to be involved in the implementation of this rule.

Participate / Learn More Regulatory Review

Some of EPA's rulemakings undergo regulatory review (What's this?), as prescribed by Executive Order 12866 and coordinated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The following list describes which of this rulemaking's stages have completed review and published in the Federal Register, if any, and provides links to the review documents where available. Consult the "Timeline" section of this Web page for the dates of each review.

  • NPRM - No Information Available.
Citations & Authorities

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Citation
40 CFR 745

Legal Authority
15 USC 2681 "TSCA 403"

Disclaimer

This site provides summaries of priority rulemakings and priority retrospective reviews of existing regulations. We update most of the site at the beginning of each month, though some data is updated more frequently if it is time sensitive. The information on this site is not intended to and does not commit EPA to specific conclusions or actions. For example, after further analysis, EPA may decide the effects of a rule would be different or it may decide to terminate a rulemaking.


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