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Oregon pesticide vendors violated laws aimed at protecting consumers from mishandling products

Release Date: 11/09/2011
Contact Information: Hanady Kader, EPA Public Affairs, 206-553-0454, kader.hanady@epa.gov Chad Schulze, EPA Pesticides Unit, 206-553-0505, schulze.chad@epa.gov

(Seattle—Nov. 9, 2011) Three Oregon companies violated federal pesticide laws designed to protect consumers, according to three separate settlements with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Nufarm Americas, Inc., Morrow County Grain Growers, Inc. and Grange Cooperative Supply Association will pay $127,000 for selling mislabeled pesticide products in Oregon.

“When pesticides aren't handled properly they can make people sick and harm the environment," said Scott Downey, Manager of EPA’s Pesticide Unit in Seattle. “Companies must label products correctly and according to the law so people can use them safely."

Nufarm Americas Inc. and Morrow County Grain Growers Inc.

Morrow County Grain Growers sold two different Nufarm Americas products with out-of-date labels at their facility in Wasco, Oregon.

Morrow County Grain Growers sold and distributed broadleaf herbicides, Weedone LV6 EC and Weedar 64, with labels lacking important updates to the first aid statements. Nufarm failed to provide the proper labeling to Morrow County Grain Growers for use when repackaging their products. The violations, discovered by an Oregon Department of Agriculture inspector, occurred from 2009 to 2010.
The active ingredient in the pesticides, 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, can cause eye irritation and damage the kidneys, thyroid and reproductive organs.

Nufarm has agreed to pay over $60,000 in fines and Morrow County Grain Growers will pay over $10,000.

Grange Cooperative Supply Association

Grange Cooperative Supply Association sold and distributed a pesticide marketed as another similar product at its business in Central Point, Oregon.

The company sold and distributed a product called Super 90—440 Spray Oil and portrayed it as Super 94—440 Spray Oil. These are two different registered pesticides with different concentrations of the same active ingredient.

The violations, discovered by an Oregon Department of Agriculture inspector, occurred in 2010.

The active ingredient in these pesticides, paraffin mineral oil, can cause eye, skin, or upper respiratory tract irritation, headaches, dizziness, and respiratory distress.

The company has agreed to pay over $57,000 in fines.

For additional information about pesticides, visit: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides.