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Public Awareness of Energy Star Surges, Helps to Fight Climate Change

Release Date: 04/10/2008
Contact Information: Shakeba Carter-Jenkins, (202) 564-4355 / carter-jenkins.shakeba@epa.gov

(Washington, D.C. - April 10, 2008) Public awareness of the Energy Star label has grown to more than 70 percent in 2008, an increase of about 20 percentage points over the last five years, according to a report released today. In many major markets where local utilities and other organizations use Energy Star to promote energy efficiency to their customers, public awareness of Energy Star is even higher, averaging nearly 80 percent.

"Consumer awareness and understanding of Energy Star continues to increase," said Bob Meyers, principal deputy assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Air & Radiation. "Greater awareness empowers Americans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by selecting more energy efficient products at home and at work."

The report released today, titled "National Awareness of Energy Star for 2007" presents an analysis of a survey commissioned by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency, a non-profit organization that promotes the manufacture and purchase of energy-efficient products and services. This is the eighth year that the survey has been conducted.

Additional results from the survey show that:

  • More than 70 percent of households reported being favorably influenced by the Energy Star label, up from about 50 percent in 2003;
  • 80 percent of these households reported they are likely to recommend Energy Star products to their friends, with 29 percent of households reporting they are "extremely likely" to recommend Energy Star.

Energy Star was introduced by EPA in 1992 as a voluntary, market-based partnership to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency. Today, the Energy Star label can be found on more than 50 different kinds of products as well as new homes. Products that have earned the Energy Star designation prevent greenhouse gas emissions by meeting strict energy-efficiency specifications set by the government. In 2007 alone, Americans, with the help of Energy Star, saved more than $16 billion on their utility bills while reducing the greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those of 27 million vehicles.

For more information or a copy of the report, visit: http://www.energystar.gov/news