Contact Us

Newsroom

2008 News Releases

 

Hazardous chemical release reporting roundup: EPA settles with Illinois, Michigan companies

Release Date: 05/20/2008
Contact Information: Kären Thompson, 312-353-8547, thompson.karen@epa.gov

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
No. 08-OPA092

CHICAGO (May 20, 2008) -- EPA Region 5 recently settled two cases involving hazardous chemical releases. The facilities cited are located in Lanark, Illinois, and Belleville, Michigan.

Royster-Clark Inc., 25885 State Route 72, Lanark, paid a $10,478 penalty. The facility was cited for failure to promptly report an 800-pound release of anhydrous ammonia to the National Response Center on October 19, 2005. The NRC was notified more than two hours after the company knew of the incident. The chemical was released from a nurse tank during transport and lasted approximately 20 minutes. It was eight times the reportable quantity.

Anhydrous ammonia is commonly used in commercial refrigeration systems and as fertilizer. The chemical causes burns to skin and irritation to the eyes, nose and throat and may be fatal if inhaled for long periods of time. An anhydrous ammonia release greater than 100 pounds must be reported immediately.

Wayne Disposal Inc., 49350 Interstate-94 North Service Drive, Belleville, paid a $18,648 penalty. The facility was cited for failure to promptly report a 250-pound release of leachate (waste) containing chlorobenzenes and chlorophenols to the National Response Center on July 21, 2006. The NRC was notified more than two days after the company knew of the incident. The chemical was spilled from a container at the Wayne wastewater treatment plant and was 250 times the reportable quantity. Wayne Disposal has cleaned up the site of the release.

Leachate is a liquid produced when rain falls on a landfill, sinks into the waste and picks up chemicals as it seeps downward. Both industrial and municipal landfill leachate can cause cancer, birth defects and genetic damage.

The NRC activates the appropriate response authorities. Responders need to know what they're dealing with so they can take steps to protect people living and working in the area.

# # #