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EPA grant to improve water quality monitoring in the Gallatin Valley, Montana

Release Date: 06/26/2012
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EPA grant to improve water quality monitoring in the Gallatin Valley, Montana

EPA awarding $2.7 million nationwide to revitalize urban waters

Contacts: EPA: Lisa McClain-Vanderpool (303)312-6077; Stacey Eriksen (303)312-6692; Gallatin Local Water Quality District: Alan English (406) 582-3148


(Denver, Colo. – June 26, 2012)
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is awarding $60,000 to the Gallatin Local Water Quality District to establish an integrated stream monitoring program in the East Gallatin River-Bozeman and Bozeman Creek watersheds. Today’s announcement is part of $2.7 million EPA is providing for projects across the country to help restore urban waters, support community revitalization and protect Americans’ health.

This $60,000 grant will enable the Gallatin Local Water Quality District to establish an integrated stream monitoring program in the East Gallatin River-Bozeman and Bozeman Creek watersheds. The monitoring will enable the long term evaluation of water quality conditions and will contribute to a larger, planned District-wide monitoring program. The grant also supports the incorporation of local volunteers in the monitoring network, informing the greater Bozeman community about water quality conditions and pollution prevention.

The funding is part of EPA’s Urban Waters program, which supports communities in their efforts to access, improve and benefit from their urban waters and the surrounding land. Urban waters can be canals, rivers, lakes, wetlands, aquifers, estuaries, bays and oceans in urbanized areas.


EPA is awarding grants ranging from $30,280 to $60,000 to 46 organizations in 32 states and Puerto Rico. The projects selected for the funding will promote the restoration of urban waters through community engagement and outreach, water quality monitoring and studies, and environmental education and training. To view a list of the projects that will be funded, visit http://www.epa.gov/urbanwaters/funding

Many urban waterways have been polluted for years by sewage, runoff from city streets and contamination from abandoned industrial facilities. Healthy and accessible urban waters can help grow local businesses and enhance economic, educational, recreational and social opportunities in nearby communities. By reconnecting communities to their local urban waters, EPA will help communities become active participants in restoring urban waters while improving their neighborhoods.

Information on EPA’s Urban Waters program:
http://www.epa.gov/urbanwaters/index.html

Information on the Urban Waters Federal Partnership:
http://urbanwaters.gov/