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EPA Cultivates Water-Efficient Landscapes

Release Date: 02/22/2007
Contact Information: (Media only) Dale Kemery, (202) 564-4355 / kemery.dale@epa.gov (All other inquiries) Cindy Simbanin, (202) 564-3837 / simbanin.cynthia@epa.gov

(Washington, D.C. - Feb. 22, 2007) Just in time for the spring gardening season, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is issuing its first WaterSense label for landscape irrigation. As part of the agency's new water-efficiency partnership program, two certification programs for landscape irrigation professionals received the WaterSense label for their adherence to water-saving techniques.

"Landscapes can use less water and still be beautiful and healthy," said EPA Assistant Administrator for Water Benjamin H. Grumbles. "WaterSense irrigation partners can help you find the solution that makes sense for your lawn or garden—as well as your wallet and the environment."

The first WaterSense label has been issued to the Irrigation Association's (IA) Certified Irrigation Designer program and Certified Irrigation Contractor program. To earn the WaterSense label, IA's certification programs must test for the ability to design, install and maintain water-efficient landscape irrigation systems, including tailoring systems to the surrounding landscape, selecting water-efficient equipment, tracking local climate conditions, and developing appropriate schedules for watering.

IA's certified irrigation contractors and certified irrigation designers are now eligible to become WaterSense partners and may use the WaterSense partner logo to promote their water-efficient landscape and irrigation services to consumers. EPA is inviting professionals through these programs who share a commitment to water efficiency to become partners and help consumers save water and money while maintaining their yards.

WaterSense is a voluntary public-private partnership that identifies and promotes high-performance products and programs that help preserve the nation's water supply. The WaterSense program seeks to generate support for consumer use of water-efficient products such as high-efficiency toilets, water-saving faucets, and, in the future, weather-based controllers and soil moisture sensors for lawns and gardens.

More information:

WaterSense: www.epa.gov/watersense

Certification Programs for Irrigation Professionals: epa.gov/watersense/partners/specs/cert.htm

Partnership Agreements for Certified Professionals
: epa.gov/watersense/pp/yard/irrprof.htm