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Three Utah facilities to pay penalties for Risk Management Program violations

Release Date: 08/06/2012
Contact Information: David Cobb, 303-312-6592; Richard Mylott, 303-312-6654

Three Utah facilities to pay penalties for Risk Management Program violations

Clean Air Act requirements designed to prevent accidental releases of hazardous chemicals

(Denver, Colo. - Aug 6, 2012) Three facilities in Utah -- Olympic Park (Park City), Duchesne Valley Water Treatment Plant (Duchesne), and Ashley Valley Water Treatment Plant (Vernal) -- have agreed to pay civil penalties and correct violations associated with the safe management and use of hazardous chemicals.

The penalties, collectively totaling $11,650 at all three sites, were assessed under the federal Clean Air Act which requires the development of Risk Management Programs for all public and private facilities that manufacture, process, use, store, or otherwise handle flammable and toxic chemicals such as chlorine and anhydrous ammonia.

"These requirements ensure that facilities have up-to-date procedures in place to prevent and respond to releases of toxic chemicals used on-site,” said Mike Gaydosh, EPA’s Enforcement Director in Denver. “Failure to comply with these requirements can leave the public and environment at risk from accidental releases."

By agreeing to the settlements, all three facilities have certified that they are now in compliance with federal Risk Management Program regulations. Utah Olympic Park will pay total penalties of $7,000. Duchesne Valley Water Treatment Plant will pay total penalties of $2,470. Ashley Valley Water Treatment Plant will pay total penalties of $2,180. Duchesne Valley and Ashley Valley are both owned and operated by the Central Utah Water Conservancy District.

EPA inspected the three facilities in 2011 and found various violations of Risk Management Program regulations designed to prevent accidental chemical releases and minimize the impact of releases or other accidents that may occur. The three Utah facilities are subject to these regulations because they store highly toxic chemicals above regulatory thresholds.

The establishment of effective risk management plans help companies, industries and municipalities operate responsibly, assist emergency responders by providing vital information necessary to address accidents and other incidents, protect the environment by preventing and minimizing damage from accidental releases, and keep communities safer.

For more information on the Clean Air Act and risk management requirements: http://www.epa.gov/oem/content/rmp/caa_faqs.htm