Contact Us

Newsroom

1999 News Releases

 

EPA Grants Help Delaware Communities Improve Water Quality

Release Date: 11/4/1999
Contact Information: Roy Seneca (215) 814-5567

Roy Seneca (215) 814-5567

PHILADELPHIA - Public health in Delaware will be enhanced through two grants from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency totaling $21.1 million. The funds will help improve water quality throughout the state.

“These grants are important in maintaining public health. EPA is committed to helping communities get safe, clean water,” said W. Michael McCabe, EPA’s mid-Atlantic regional administrator.

The first grant for $14.6 million was awarded to the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services, and includes $10.2 million to provide loans to 13 communities to improve drinking water supplies. This grant is from EPA’s drinking water state revolving fund program to help ensure that the drinking water supplies remain safe, affordable and are properly operated and maintained. The state contributes $2.9 million matching share.

Specific improvements will include building water distribution lines, treatment facilities, and storage facilities. The remainder of funds will be used to provide technical assistance to small drinking water systems, protect source water, expand operator training and certification programs and ensure that drinking water systems remain viable.

The second grant for $6.5 million from EPA’s clean water state revolving fund goes to the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to clean and treat wastewater. The state will contribute $1.3 million matching share. These funds will finance loans to 10 communities to construct wastewater treatment facilities. Loans will also be available to individuals, farmers, and small businesses to rehabilitate private septic tanks, develop agricultural nutrient management projects and to repair or replace leaking underground storage tanks.

The funds provide assistance to communities with the greatest public health concerns, and the least ability to comply with the Clean Water Act and afford wastewater treatment facility upgrades or new construction.

Delaware has received $63.4 million for the clean water state revolving fund program over the last 10 years and more than $27.2 million for their drinking water state revolving fund program over the last 2 years. As communities repay their loans, the money becomes available for other wastewater and drinking water projects in Delaware.

#


00-51