EPA Burn Permit Programs on Indian Reservations | Region 10 | US EPA

Jump to main content.


EPA Burn Permit Programs on Indian Reservations

EPA established federal burn permit programs on the Nez Perce Indian Reservation and the Umatilla Indian Reservation under the Federal Air Rules for Indian Reservations (FARR) in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. These two tribes administer burn permit programs for EPA under a delegation agreement. EPA remains the enforcement agency for the programs. There is also a General Open Burning Rule that applies on all 39 reservations under the FARR.

On this page:

If you live on the Nez Perce Indian Reservation, please check the Nez Perce Air Quality Program Web site or call 1-800-720-4089 for more information about burn permits within the Reservation.

If you live on the Umatilla Indian Reservation, please check the Umatilla Office of Air Quality Web site or call 541-429-7080 for more information about burn permits within the Reservation.

Top of page


General Open Burning Permits

The FARR Rule for General Open Burning Permits establishes a permit program for open burning on the Nez Perce Indian Reservation and on the Umatilla Indian Reservation only. People who want to perform open burning within these Reservations must get a permit issued by the Tribe.

Open burning is where the smoke, gases, chemicals, and other products from burning enter the air directly, without first going through a chimney, flue, vent, or other similar path (for example, a burn barrel or outside fire pit.) Cultural and traditional open burning is not affected by this rule.

Open Burning Permit Applications - Please print and sign the application and instructions.

Fact Sheet: Open Burning Permits (PDF) (2 pp, 45K) - For Nez Perce and Umatilla Reservations only.

Top of page


Agricultural Burning Permits

The FARR Rule for Agricultural Burning Permits establishes a permit program for agricultural burning on the Nez Perce Indian Reservation and on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. People who want to perform agricultural burning within these Reservations must get a permit issued by the Tribe.

Agricultural burning is the burning of crop or other vegetation from agricultural activities. Agricultural burning includes, but is not limited to, windrow burning, ditch burning, stubble burning, and field sanitation. Agricultural burning may be performed to prevent disease, control pests, rotate crops, or for crop reproduction.

Why is it important to control agricultural burning? Smoke is made up of a complex mixture of gases and fine particles produced when wood and other organic matter burn. The biggest health threat from smoke comes from fine particles. These microscopic particles can get into your eyes and respiratory system, where they can cause health problems such as burning eyes, runny nose, and illnesses such as bronchitis. Fine particles can also aggravate asthma and chronic heart and lung diseases, and they are linked to premature deaths in people with these chronic conditions.

Who does this rule apply to? This rule applies to anyone who conducts agricultural burning within the Nez Perce Indian Reservation and the Umatilla Indian Reservation only.

Agricultural Burning Permit Applications - Please print and sign the application and instructions.

Fact Sheet: Agricultural Burning Permits (PDF) (2 pp, 44K) - For Nez Perce and Umatilla Reservations only.

Top of page


Forestry and Silvicultural Burning Permits

The FARR Rule for Forestry and Silvicultural Burning Permits establishes a permit program for forestry and silvicultural burning on the Nez Perce Indian Reservation and on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. People who want to perform forestry and silvicultural burning within these Reservations will need to get a permit issued by the Tribe.

Forestry and silvicultural burning is the burning of vegetation that comes from the growing and harvesting of trees and timber. This type of burning includes slash burning, burning for reducing fire hazards, and burning for managing the forest environment. Burning may also be performed to prevent disease, to control pests, and for forest reproduction.

Why is it important to control forestry and silvicultural burning? Smoke is made up of a complex mixture of gases and fine particles produced when wood and other organic matter burn. The biggest health threat from smoke comes from fine particles. These microscopic particles can get into your eyes and respiratory system, where they can cause health problems such as burning eyes, runny nose, and illnesses such as bronchitis. Fine particles can also aggravate asthma and chronic heart and lung diseases, and they are linked to premature deaths in people with these chronic conditions.

Who does this rule apply to? This rule applies to anyone who conducts forestry and silvicultural burning within the Nez Perce Indian Reservation and the Umatilla Indian Reservation only.

Forestry and Silvicultural Burning Permit Applications - Please print and sign the application and instructions.

Fact Sheet: Forestry and Silvicultural Burning Permits (PDF) (2 pp, 43K) - For Nez Perce and Umatilla Reservations only.

Top of page


When did these rules take effect?

These rules were effective June 7, 2005. The rules were published in the Federal Register on April 8, 2005 (67 FR 18074).


Local Navigation


URL: http://yosemite.epa.gov/R10/tribal.nsf/Programs/farr-permits

Jump to main content.