Children's Environmental Health: Healthy Schools | Region 10 | US EPA

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Children's Environmental Health: Healthy Schools

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EPA's newsletter for tips and information to keep schools in the Pacific Northwest environmentally healthy and pollution-free. Read Healthy School News »

Contact Us

Peter Murchie (murchie.peter@epa.gov)
Children's Environmental Health
(206) 553-1148

Alanna Conley (conley.alanna@epa.gov)
Healthy Schools, (503) 326-6831

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Questions about lead?
Maria Tartaglia (tartaglia.maria@epa.gov)
206-553-1128

Questions about indoor air/radon?
Davis Zhen (zhen.davis@epa.gov)
206-553-7660

Questions about construction/demolition?
John Pavitt (pavitt.john@epa.gov)
907-271-3688

Questions about air quality?
Brook Madrone (madrone.brooke@epa.gov)
206-553-0244

Questions about air quality in tribal communities?
Erin McTigue (mctigue.erin@epa.gov)
206-553-1254

Questions about pest management?
Juliann Barta (barta.juliann@epa.gov)
206-553-1495

Questions about PCBs?
Michelle Mullin (mullin.michelle@epa.gov)
206-553-1616

Questions about pollution prevention or Energy Star?
Carolyn Gangmark (gangmark.carolyn@epa.gov)
206-553-4072

Questions about environmental education?
Sally Hanft (hanft.sally@epa.gov)
206-553-1207

More than 3 million children and 115,000 adults spend a majority of their days in public, tribal and private school buildings in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. Many of these buildings and grounds are aging and contributing to environmental conditions that inhibit learning and pose increased health risks to children and staff. Indoor air quality, lead, PCBs, asbestos, idling school buses and pest control are just a few of the concerns that plague our schools and ultimately the health of students and staff. Learn what you can do to protect children where they learn and play.


What's New?

Sensible Steps to Healthier School Environments Webinar Series

This EPA webinar series outlines sensible, low- or no-cost steps that school communities can take to create healthier environments in their buildings. View the webinar schedule

Region 10 wishes to congratulate the following innovative schools for achieving Green Ribbon School Awards.

Oregon

  • Jesuit High School, Portland
  • Willamette High School, Eugene

Washington

  • Bertschi School, Seattle
  • Shadow Lake Elementary, Maple Valley
  • Vancouver Public Schools, Vancouver

2014 Department of Education Green Ribbon School Awardees


Simple Tools to Determine Your School's Health

The School Health Index (SHI): Self-Assessment & Planning Guide 2012 is an online self-assessment and planning tool that schools can use to improve their health and safety policies and programs. It was developed by CDC in partnership with school administrators and staff, school health experts, parents, and national nongovernmental health and education agencies to identify the policies and practices most likely to be effective in reducing youth health risk behaviors.


Green Ribbon Schools

The U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools award honors exemplary schools that take actions to maximize energy and water conservation, work towards environmental literacy and reduce contaminants in and around the school. Many actions are no or low cost projects and can be achieved by schools with limited budgets. A series of free online seminars are available to provide training on creating healthy school environments. Check out the Green Strides Webinars

Check your state for applications and deadlines.

The School Health Index (SHI): Self-Assessment & Planning Guide 2012 is an online self-assessment and planning tool developed by CDC in partnership with school administrators and staff, school health experts, parents, and national nongovernmental health and education agencies to identify the policies and practices most likely to be effective in reducing youth health risk behaviors.


Key Issues

Other Resources

Voluntary Guidelines for States: Development and Implementation of a School Environmental Health Program

Unhealthy school environments can affect children’s health, attendance, concentration, and performance, as well as lead to expensive, time-consuming cleanup and remediation activities. These new voluntary guidelines recommend six steps states can take to build or enhance a school environmental health program. To learn more about the guidelines Visit the State School Environmental Health Guidelines website.


Local Navigation


URL: http://yosemite.epa.gov/R10/ECOCOMM.NSF/Childrenshealth/schools

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