Environmental Protection Agency
Skip common site navigation and headers
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Waste Site Cleanup & Reuse in New England
  Serving Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont & 9 Tribal Nations
Begin Hierarchical Links EPA Home > EPA New England > Cleanup > Find NE Sites > FORT DEVENS-SUDBURY TRAINING ANNEX End Hierarchical Links


 

   
Table of Contents:
 Advanced Search
 Site Type: Long Term/National Priorities List (NPL) Click to see more about Site Type and how it is used?

  FORT DEVENS-SUDBURY TRAINING ANNEX


Map this site in Cleanups in My Community
 Sudbury and Maynard and Hudson and Stow,  Massachusetts
 Middlesex County
 Street Address: HUDSON RD
 Zip Code: 01775
 Congressional
 District(s):

05
 EPA ID #: MAD980520670
 Site ID #: 0100685
 Site Aliases:

 Site Responsibility: Federal

 NPL LISTING HISTORY
 Proposed Date 07/14/1998
 Final Date 02/21/1990
  Deleted Date 01/29/2002

Site Description
[Back to Top]

The Sudbury Training Annex (Annex) is a former U.S. Army military installation that covers approximately four square miles (2,750 acres) and includes portions of the Towns of Maynard, Stow, Hudson, and Sudbury. It is located 20 miles west of Boston. Hudson Road divides the site into two sections. Established in 1942, the Annex has served as an ammunition depot, an ordinance test station, a troop training and research area, and a laboratory disposal area. In the southern smaller section of the Annex, there is the Caphart Family Housing Area, a military family housing area. In the northern portion, operations currently include a United States Air Force (USAF) radar installation, a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) regional operations center and FEMA training areas. The Fish and Wildlife Service opened most of the rest of the former installation at the Assabet River Wildlife Refuge on October 23, 2005. Approximately 35,700 people obtain drinking water from public and private wells located within three miles of the Annex; however, no private or public drinking water sources are contaminated. Aside from Army structures and cleared areas, the majority of the Annex is undeveloped with a patchwork of forest and poorly drained sections or lowlands. Between 1980 and 2001, the Army conducted investigations at the Annex to address potentially contaminated areas. Some areas identified include a landfill, a former fire training and flame retardant clothing test area, underground storage tanks, railyard maintenance area, pesticide storage area, ammunition demolition area, and various reported disposal areas. In 1995, the Annex was selected for closure. Except for property the Army will retain for housing, 2205 acres were transferred to the US Fish and Wildlife Service, approximately 400 acres were transferred to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and approximately 10 acres were transferred to the Air Force Radar Laboratory. On November 30, 2001, a Notice of Intent to Delete was published. Public comments were taken on the EPA decision to remove this site from the National Priorities List (NPL) until December 30, 2001. The site has been deleted from the NPL.

Threats and Contaminants
[Back to Top]

Portions of the Annex groundwater has been found to contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and inorganics above drinking water standards, however this contamination is contained under a landfill cap. Other areas of the Annex contained contaminated soil, but have been cleaned up.

Cleanup Approach
[Back to Top]

The site has been addressed in two phases: initial actions and long-term remedial actions focusing on cleanup of the A7 Old Gravel Pit Landfill, A9, and other smaller areas containing limited volumes of contaminated soil.

Response Action Status
[Back to Top]

Initial Action In 1985, the Army removed 300 gallons of Arochlor and approximately 75 tons of Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil from a staging area. In the fall of 1985, an additional 86 tons of PCB-contaminated soil were removed from this same area. Between the fall of 1987 and the summer of 1988, the Army removed approximately 1,110 cubic yards of contaminated soil from a former fire training area. In 1993, the Army completed the removal of underground storage tanks to the Annex. To prevent trespassers from physical harm or from coming into contact with contaminated areas, the Army has fenced off several sites and buildings. Since the transfer of the property from the Army, many fences and buildings have been removed. The only area of contamination left on site, the A7 Old gravel Pit Landfill, is fully fenced.

A7 Old Gravel Pit Landfill This area was used from the early 1940s to the early 1980s for the disposal of laboratory chemicals from the Natick Laboratory and miscellaneous solid waste. In 1991, the Army began an investigation into the nature and extent of contamination at the landfill site. Construction of the landfill cap was substantially completed by December 1996. A Record of Decision (ROD) regarding the groundwater was finalized in September 1997. Semi-annual groundwater sampling started in April 1997. A frequency change to annual monitoring began in 2009. Institutional controls (no residential use and no drinking water wells) are implemented and are being monitored on an annual basis. The most recent five year evaluation was performed in 2011. No issues pertaining to the protectiveness of the remedy were found. The next evaluation of the site will take place in 2016.

A9 Former Fire Training and Flame Retardant Clothing Testing Area Contaminated soil from the fire training area was removed between 1987 and 1988. An underground storage tank that was used to store fuel for the clothing test area was removed in 1992. In 1991, the Army began an investigation into the nature and extent of the contamination. In the fall of 1995, a source control remedy was selected that called for the removal of contaminated soil. The contaminated soil removal action was completed in July 1996. After a supplemental groundwater investigation in 1996, it was determined in September 1997 that no action was necessary for groundwater.

A4 Waste Dump In 1991, the Army began an investigation into the nature and extent of this disposal area. Additional investigations did not identify any contamination requiring action. A No Action ROD was finalized in 1997.

P11/P13 and A12/P36/P37 These were sites where the Army conducted research and training. Several underground storage tanks were removed and investigations did not identify further action. A No Action Record of Decision (ROD) for these five areas was finalized in September 1996.

Other Areas Investigation findings of site work conducted in 1996 were presented in the spring of 1997. No further Action was agreed upon by the EPA, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MADEP) and the Army in November 1998 for sites, SA A3, SA A5, SA A11, SA P5, and SA P6. Investigation findings of site work conducted in 1997 was presented in the fall of 1998. No Further Action was agreed upon by the EPA and Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MADEP) for sites SA P22, SA P31, and SA P35. No Further Action was also agreed upon between the EPA and MADEP In December 1999 for sites A-10, SA P1, SA P4, SA P9, SA P17, SA P20, SA P28, SA P38, SA P45, SA P54, SA P59, SA P60, AND SA P61. Study area P27 underwent a soil removal action excavation which completed in September 2000. All areas have been cleaned up.

Enforcement HighlightsA two-party Interagency Agreement between the EPA and the Army was signed in 1991 outlining the responsibility for the site cleanup. The Sudbury Training Annex is participating in the Installation Restoration Program, a specially funded program established by the Department of Defense (DOD) in 1978 to identify, investigate, and control the migration of hazardous contaminants at military and other DOD facilities. An EPA Technical Assistance Grant was awarded to a local community group called Four Town FOCUS (Families Organized to Clean Up Sites) in October 1991 to hire technical advisors to help them better understand site-related technical information and communicate their concerns. The TAG is no longer active since the Site has been taken off the NPL.

Environmental Progress
[Back to Top]

Removing contaminated soil and underground storage tanks and fencing the site has reduced the potential for risk at the Fort Devens-Sudbury Training Annex site. At 72 of 72 study areas, it has been determined that no further actions are needed. The Army point of contact is Bob Simeone. Bob can be reached at (978) 796-2205. In 1985, the Army removed 300 gallons of Arochlor and approximately 75 tons of Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil from a staging area. In the Fall of 1985, an additional 86 tons of PCB-contaminated soil were removed from this same area. Between the Fall of 1987 and the Summer of 1988, the Army removed approximately 1,110 cubic yards of contaminated soil from a former fire training area. The site was added to the NPL in 1990. In 1993, the Army completed the removal of underground storage tanks to the Annex. To prevent trespassers from physical harm or from coming into contact with contaminated areas, the Army has fenced off the A7- old Gravel Pit Landfill. No Further Action was agreed upon by the EPA, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MADEP) and the Army in November 1998 for study areas, SA A3, SA A5, SA A11, SA P5, and SA P6. No Further Action was also agreed upon by the EPA and Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MADEP) for study areas SA P22, SA P31, and SA P35 in April 1999. No Further Action was also agreed upon between the EPA and MADEP. In December 1999 for study areas A-10, SA P1, SA P4, SA P9, SA P17, SA P20, SA P28, SA P38, SA P45, SA P54, SA P59, SA P60, AND SA P61. Study area P27 underwent a soil removal action excavation which completed in September 2000. All areas have been cleaned up. The site is in the O&M phase. Construction complete was attained in FY 2000. A Five Year Review was performed in 2001. On November 30, 2001 a Notice of Intent to Delete and a Final Deletion Notice were published in the Federal Register. Public comments on the EPA's decision to remove the site from the National Priorities List were taken until December 30, 2001. This site was deleted from the NPL (National Priorities List) on January 29, 2002. Most of the site is now a US Fish and Wildlife Service controlled National wildlife Refuge named the Assabet River Wildlife Refuge. The US Army, US Air Force and the Federal Emergency Management Agency retained some land at the Site.

Current Site Status
[Back to Top]

This site was deleted from the NPL (National Priorities List) on January 29, 2002. Most of the site is now a US Fish and Wildlife Service controlled National wildlife Refuge named the Assabet River Wildlife Refuge. The US Army, US Air Force and the Federal Emergency Management Agency retained some land at the Site. The Old Gravel Landfill (site A7) cap and groundwater is monitored by the Army on a yearly basis. The next Five Year Review is due to be completed in 2016.

Site Photos
[Back to Top]


SDMS 452908
The Old Gravel Landfill is capped. The Army monitors the cap and groundwater annually.

Links to Other Site Information
[Back to Top]
Disclaimer Instructions about PDF

Newsletters & Press Releases:
Press Releases about this project  

Federal Register Notices:
Final NPL Listing  

Reports and Studies:
Five Year Review Report, September 25, 2001 (2431KB)  
Second Five-Year Review Report, September 25, 2006 (18.89 MB)  
Third Five-Year Review Report, September 15, 2011 (11.4 MB)  

Decision Documents:
View Records of Decision (RODS) on-line (EPA HQ)  
Record of Decision (ROD), Operable Unit 1 - AOC 7 and Operable Unit 2 - AOC 9, September 29, 1995 (2.61 MB)   
Institutional Controls at this site  

Other Links:
NPL Site Narrative at Listing:  
Site Progress Profile  
"Behind the Scenes" Fact Sheet  

Site Repositories
[Back to Top]

Devens - RFTA- Devens, MA, by appointment only 978-796-2205.


Contacts
[Back to Top

EPA Remedial Project Manager: Christine Williams
Address: US Environmental Protection Agency
5 Post Office Square, Suite 100
Mail Code OSRR07-3
Boston, MA 02109-3912
Phone #: 617-918-1384
E-Mail Address: williams.christine@epa.gov

EPA Community Involvement Coordinator: Pamela Harting-Barrat
Address: US Environmental Protection Agency
5 Post Office Square, Suite 100
Mail Code ORA20-1
Boston, MA 02109-3912
Phone #: 617-918-1318
E-Mail Address: harting-barrat.pamela@epa.gov

 


Serving Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, & 9 Tribal Nations
 
Begin Site Footer

EPA Home | Privacy and Security Notice | Contact Us

Last updated on Monday, September 23rd, 2013
URL: http://www.epa.gov/region1/superfund/sites/sudburyannex