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Show details for Air Emissions (RCRA)Air Emissions (RCRA)
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Hide details for Household Hazardous WasteHousehold Hazardous Waste
09/26/2012RECOMMENDATION ON THE DISPOSAL OF HOUSEHOLD PHARMACEUTICALS COLLECTED BY TAKE-BACK EVENTS, MAIL-BACK, AND OTHER COLLECTION PROGRAMSMemo
 Description: Although household pharmaceuticals received by collection programs are excluded from federal RCRA hazardous waste regulations (40 CFR 261.4(b)(1)), EPA recommends that such pharmaceuticals be incinerated in a permitted hazardous waste incinerator or cement kiln. When hazardous waste combustion is not feasible, at a minimum, collected household pharmaceuticals should be incinerated at a facility that meets EPA’s Large or Small Municipal Waste Combustor standards.
 
01/15/2010MANAGEMENT OF CONTAMINATED HUMAN REMAINS AND PERSONAL EFFECTS FROM HOMELAND SECURITY EVENTSMemo
 Description: EPA does not consider RCRA to apply to human remains that are cremated or buried. EPA also does not consider RCRA to apply to contaminated human remains from a biological, radiological, or nuclear event. Most personal effects generated from a Homeland Security event would be exempt from the federal hazardous waste requirements pursuant to the household hazardous waste exemption.
 
05/21/2007APPLICABILITY OF RCRA TO DISPOSAL OF UNIFIED GROUP RATION - EXPRESS (UGR-E)Memo
 Description: For disposal of expired flameless heaters in Unified Group Ration - Express (UGR-E), EPA believes that it is unlikely that intact UGR-Es would be RCRA hazardous waste when disposed. For disposal of unused, individual chemical heaters by a unit, although the heaters may exhibit the characteristic of reactivity, EPA believes unused individual heaters taken from an UGR-E issued for use in the field are excluded under the household waste exclusion. Therefore, EPA urges generators and handlers to manage unused heaters carefully and recycle them if possible.
 
10/01/2006Be Smart (for Consumers) (Poster)Publication
 Description: This poster provides suggestions for households to be smart by safely using, storing, and disposing of common products, such as cleaners.
 
10/01/2006Por Supuesto Que Su Hogar Está Limpio...¿Pero Es Seguro para Su Familia? (Spanish - Sure, Your Home Is Clean... But Is It Safe for Your Family?)Publication
 Description: This poster is the Spanish version of Sure, Your Home Is Clean... But Is It Safe for Your Family? (EPA530-F-06-013). This document provides suggestions to be smart about using, storing, and disposing of household products. These tips include always reading the label, keeping products in their original containers, trying alternative products when available, and disposing of household products safely.
 
10/01/2006Sea Inteligente (para los Consumidores) (Poster) (Spanish - Be Smart (for Consumers))Publication
 Description: This poster is the Spanish version of Be Smart (for Consumers). This poster provides suggestions for households to be smart by safely using, storing, and disposing of common products, such as cleaners.
 
10/01/2006Sure, Your Home Is Clean... But Is It Safe for Your Family?Publication
 Description: This document provides suggestions to be smart about using, storing, and disposing of household products. These tips include always reading the label, keeping products in their original containers, trying alternative products when available, and disposing of household products safely.
 
10/29/2004CLASSIFICATION AND DISPOSAL OF WASTE FLAMELESS RATION HEATERSMemo
 Description: The disposal of flameless ration heaters (FRHs) that are discarded by individual soldiers issued Meals, Ready-to-Eat (MREs) is excluded from RCRA Subtitle C regulation under the household waste exclusion. It is unlikely that multiple, unused MREs (that contain FRHs) would be RCRA hazardous waste when disposed. EPA generally considers multiple unused FRHs (not packaged with MREs) that are discarded to be a D003 reactive waste which, therefore, must be managed as a RCRA hazardous waste when disposed.
 
06/23/2003APPLICABILITY OF THE HOUSEHOLD WASTE EXCLUSION TO ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED PLANTSMemo
 Description: Excluded household hazardous waste (HHW) must be generated by individuals on the premises of a household and composed primarily of materials found in wastes generated by consumers in their homes (SEE ALSO: 49 FR 44978, 11/13/84; 63 FR 70241, 12/18/98; RPC# 3/7/1995-08; RPC# 7/31/2000-01). Arsenic-contaminated plants generated at a home may qualify for the HHW exclusion if the contamination results from normal household activities (e.g., residential use of CCA-treated wood or pesticide). If the contamination results from significant arsenic sources other than household activities (e.g., industrial or mining activities), the exclusion is not applicable. HHW does not have to be generated by a homeowner to be eligible. The generator may be a resident "do-it-yourselfer" or a contractor.
 
03/01/2003Rules Changed to Help Accelerated Lead-Based Paint Removal (Fact Sheet)Publication
 Description: This fact sheet provides information about how EPA is reducing costs and removing obstacles associated with the disposal of residential lead-based paint. This action will speed up the removal of lead-based paint from older residences, thereby reducing health risks to children from lead.
 
01/21/2003DISPOSAL OF HOUSEHOLD PAINT Memo
 Description: Under the federal rules, old paint containers that are accumulated in the home may be disposed of as municipal solid waste. EPA encourages the public to take household hazardous waste (HHW) to local HHW collection centers for recycling or licensed hazardous waste facilities for disposal. The city or county department of environmental services can provide further information about HHW programs.
 
12/20/2002MANAGEMENT OF USED ELECTRONICS Memo
 Description: EPA and its state partners have developed detailed regulations to ensure proper waste management to prevent pollution. EPA, states, industry, and nonprofit groups are working to solve challenges presented by used electronics. EPA initiatives currently include proposed changes to the hazardous waste regulations to encourage the recycling of cathode ray tubes (CRTs), the National Electronics Product Stewardship Initiative, and the development of a national electronics recycling outreach campaign (SEE ALSO: 67 FR 40508; 6/12/02).
 
09/01/2002Service-Learning: Education Beyond the ClassroomPublication
 Description: Service learning projects enable students to learn through community service and volunteer activities. This booklet describes how students across the country are gaining hands-on awareness of waste reduction, recycling, and composting, through solid waste service-learning projects. Service-learning, an educational experience that combines knowledge with service and personal reflection, is teaching kindergarten through 12th-grade students various aspects of safe solid waste management, such as reducing household hazardous waste and buying recycled-content products. This booklet contains 17 profiles of school-based and community projects. Contacts and additional resources are also included to provide information on how to start a solid waste service-learning program.
 
07/31/2000REGULATORY STATUS OF WASTE GENERATED BY CONTRACTORS AND RESIDENTS FROM LEAD-BASED PAINT ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED IN HOUSEHOLDSMemo
 Description: Lead-based paint (LBP) debris generated by contractors in households is excluded household hazardous waste. LBP waste from abatement, renovation, and remodeling in homes and other residences eligible for exclusion. LBP waste from households may be subject to state, local and/or tribal government regulation (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 70233; 12/18/1998).
 
04/07/2000LABELING OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN PRODUCTSMemo
 Description: EPA does not have authority to regulate household hazardous waste (HHW) or the labeling of these products. EPA’s authority is limited to issuing criteria for design of municipal solid waste landfills. The collection, transport, and disposal of HHW and other municipal solid wastes are state and local community issues.
 
01/13/2000HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSALMemo
 Description: Modern landfills are carefully designed and monitored to allow for safe disposal of household hazardous wastes (HHW). Many states and communities collect HHW to be reused, recycled, or sent to special facilities designed to manage hazardous waste.
 
09/14/1999AUTOMATIC SHUT-OFF IRONS THAT CONTAIN MERCURYMemo
 Description: Automatic shut-off irons containing mercury that are generated from households can be disposed in municipal landfills. Modern landfills are carefully designed and monitored to allow for safe disposal of household hazardous wastes (HHW). Many states and communities collect HHW so they can dispose of them safely.
 
08/01/1998IMPORTED HOUSEHOLD WASTEQuestion & Answer
 Description: Imported household hazardous waste is excluded from the definition of solid hazardous waste in the same way as domestically generated household hazardous waste. U.S. importers may be required to fulfill certain obligations if the exporting country or the importer's contract with the exporter requires it. U.S. importers may want to keep records of the foreign exporter should questions arise as to the status of the waste.
 
08/13/1997APPLICABILITY OF HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE EXCLUSION TO NATURAL GAS REGULATORS CONTAINING MERCURYMemo
 Description: Household hazardous waste must be generated by individuals on the premises of a household and must be composed primarily of materials found in the waste generated by consumers in their home. Natural gas regulators are not eligible for the household hazardous waste exclusion since they are installed, replaced, and collected by utilities and gas suppliers.
 
04/11/1997PAINT RECYCLINGMemo
 Description: Paint or coating remixed and used for its intended purpose is not a solid waste. If paint is discarded, the generator must make a hazardous waste determination. Discarded paints generally are not listed wastes, but they may exhibit characteristics such as ignitability or toxicity. Paint generated by a CESQG is not subject to federal regulation provided the waste is discarded at a facility meeting Section 261.5(f) or (g). Paint collected from households is exempt from regulation, even if the paint is subsequently discarded. Household hazardous waste (HHW) mixed with regulated hazardous waste in a collection program is regulated. Paint cans emptied under the empty container provisions are not subject to regulation because they do not hold regulated residues.
 
09/12/1996OPTIONS FOR DISPOSING OF LEAD CONTAMINATED SOIL REMOVED FROM RESIDENTIAL AND PUBLIC BUILDING PROPERTYMemo
 Description: Lead contaminated soils that qualify for the household hazardous waste exclusion are exempt from RCRA Subtitle C but remain subject to RCRA Subtitle D disposal requirements when disposed off-site. A landfill that accepts household waste is regulated as a municipal solid waste landfill subject to Part 258. The HWIR-Media rule may not fully address concerns about RCRA's potential effect on lead abatement programs (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 65873; 11/30/98). EPA is interested in a rule that will accommodate routine cleanup activities such as lead abatement programs.
 
07/12/1996MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OF WASTE VINYL MINI BLINDSMemo
 Description: Toxicity characteristic (D008) lead-containing mini blinds are not solid waste if they are returned to the manufacturer for resale in a reverse distribution system. Blinds from homes, apartments, and hotels are exempt household hazardous waste (HHW). Waste from hospitals, offices, day care centers, and non-residential buildings at military bases are not HHW. HHW and non-HHW must be segregated. A generator can test waste or apply knowledge. The most conservative approach assumes that the blinds are hazardous waste (HW). The generator is vulnerable for enforcement for an incorrect determination if subsequent EPA testing reveals that the waste is HW.
 
06/01/1996Environmental Fact Sheet: Standards Issued for Nonmunicipal Solid Waste Units that Receive CESQG Hazardous WastePublication
 Description: Announces the promulgation of standards for nonmunicipal solid waste units that receive hazardous waste from CESQGs. Explains new technical standards for nonmunicipal nonhazardous waste disposal units that receive CESQG hazardous wastes; these include location restrictions, groundwater monitoring requirements, and corrective action standards. Describes the three types of facilities that might receive CESQG waste and how they might be affected by this rule.
 
05/01/1995RESTAURANT WASTE AND THE HOUSEHOLD WASTE EXCLUSIONQuestion & Answer
 Description: Restaurant wastes are generally not household hazardous wastes (HHW). HHW must be generated at a temporary or permanent residence and be made up of consumer wastes. Waste from a restaurant that is part of temporary or permanent residence may be excluded.
 
03/07/1995APPLICABILITY OF THE HOUSEHOLD WASTE EXCLUSION TO LEAD-CONTAMINATED SOILMemo
 Description: Lead-contaminated soil at a residence is exempt household hazardous waste (HHW) if it is the result of routine stripping and painting or natural weathering of lead-based paint (LBP). LBP chips from stripping and repainting of residence walls by an owner or contractor are HHW. Construction, renovation, or demolition debris is not HHW (SUPERSEDED: See RPC# 7/31/00-01). Waste generated by home health care providers may be HHW. Media and debris contaminated by residential heating oil tanks are household hazardous waste (HHW). Covering residential soil containing hazardous waste with sod, mulch, or gravel does not constitute generation, treatment, or disposal of hazardous waste and triggers no Subtitle C obligations. HHW mixed with a regulated hazardous waste is subject to Subtitle C regulation. The Subtitle D regulations (Part 257 open dumping rules and Part 258 municipal solid waste landfill regulations) may not apply to household waste disposed on residential property.
 
03/01/1995HOTEL DRY CLEANING WASTE AND THE HOUSEHOLD WASTE EXCLUSIONSQuestion & Answer
 Description: Wastes produced by a hotel dry cleaning facility are not household wastes and therefore are not excluded from RCRA regulation. Two criteria must be met for household hazardous wastes (HHW) to be excluded. Hotel wastes that are similar to wastes generated by consumers in their homes are excluded.
 
03/01/1995Reusable News (Spring 1995)Publication
 Description: This issue of Reusable News focuses on household hazardous waste, and also includes articles on McDonald's ""buy recycled"" campaign and waste reduction efforts, paper procurement guidelines, plastics recycling, and life-cycle analysis.
 
02/28/1995DO RCRA REQUIREMENTS APPLY TO THE HANDLING, SHIPMENT AND DISPOSAL OF HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE COMPONENTS?Memo
 Description: Household hazardous waste (HHW) must be generated on the premises and composed primarily of materials generated by consumers in their homes. Contractor-generated waste is exempt if it is from routine residential maintenance.
 
10/01/1994STATUS OF MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION (MWC) ASHQuestion & Answer
 Description: Municipal waste combustion (MWC) ash is subject to regulation if it exhibits a characteristic. Discusses the history of municipal waste combustion regulation. Ash from waste-to-energy facilities is a newly-identified waste for purposes of the land disposal restrictions (LDR). (SEE ALSO: 59 FR 29372; 6/7/94; 60 FR 6666; 2/3/95; RPC# 3/22/95-01)
 
09/28/1994CLARIFICATION REGARDING THE ""REBUTTABLE PRESUMPTION"" PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN THE RECYCLED USED OIL MANAGEMENT STANDARDSMemo
 Description: Used oil generated by a Do-It-Yourselfer (DIY) qualifies as exempt household hazardous waste. A used oil generator who collects DIY oil with a high halogen content can rebut the hazardous waste presumption by citing the household hazardous waste exemption.
 
08/18/1994REGULATORY STATUS OF MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR ASH FROM COMBUSTOR THAT BURNS ONLY HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE AND DOES NOT RECOVER ENERGYMemo
 Description: Ash from municipal waste combustors that do not recover energy and that burn only household waste is exempt household hazardous waste (HHW). Ash from resource recovery facilities that burn commercial waste is not exempt. Ash from combustors that burn other wastes in addition to HHW is not exempt (SUPERSEDED: see 60 FR 6666; 2/3/95).
 
07/11/1994APPLICABILITY OF RCRA USED OIL REGULATIONS TO USED OIL CONTAINED IN DISCARDED HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCESMemo
 Description: Discarded household appliances containing used oil are regulated under Part 279 if the oil is recycled, and as hazardous waste if the oil is characteristic and disposed. Chlorinated fluorocarbon (CFC)-contaminated used oil is exempt from the rebuttable presumption at the point of draining provided the CFCs will be reclaimed. Removal of CFCs is not treatment. Appliances from which used oil has been removed such that no visible signs of free-flowing oil remain in or on the material are not subject to Part 279.
 
05/27/1994IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY OF U.S. SUPREME COURT DECISION CITY OF CHICAGO V. EDF FOR MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR ASHMemo
 Description: The implementation strategy following the Supreme Court Decision states Section 3001(i) does not exempt ash from resource recovery facilities burning household and nonhazardous commercial wastes. Waste-to-energy facilities must set up programs to determine if ash is hazardous and must manage hazardous ash in an environmentally responsible manner. Discusses factors to consider in an enforcement response (SUPERSEDED: see RPC# 3/22/95-01).
 
05/27/1994Implementation Strategy of U.S. Supreme Court Decision in City of Chicago v. EDF for Municipal Waste Combustion Ash; MemorandumPublication
 Description: This memorandum discusses the May 2, 1994, U.S. Supreme Court opinion, which states that Section 3001(i) of RCRA does not exempt ash generated at resource recovery facilities (i.e., waste-to-energy facilities) burning household wastes and nonhazardous commercial wastes from the hazardous waste requirements of Subtitle C of RCRA. It also examines EPA's strategy for assisting waste-to-energy facilities to comply with the RCRA Subtitle C requirements.
 
05/24/1994STATUS OF WASTES GENERATED FROM ABATEMENT OF LEAD-BASED PAINTMemo
 Description: Lead-based paint (LBP) abatement wastes are not household hazardous waste (HHW) if generated in construction, demolition, or renovation, but are exempt HHW if generated in routine residential maintenance (SUPERSEDED: See 63 FR 70233, 70241; 12/18/98). EPA does not distinguish between wastes generated by homeowners and contractors (SEE ALSO: RPC# 3/7/95-01). Unless it is HHW, LBP abatement waste exhibiting the toxicity characteristic for lead (D008) is currently regulated under Subtitle C. EPA may amend RCRA Subtitle C rules to remove the disincentives to abate LBP.
 
04/08/1994CLARIFICATION OF USED OIL RULES AS THEY APPLY TO DO-IT-YOURSELF OIL CHANGERSMemo
 Description: Do-It-Yourself (DIY) used oil (UO) generators are not subject to the used oil standards. Do-It-Yourself oil is subject to Part 279 regulation once it has been collected. Collected Do-It-Yourself oil is subject to the rebuttable presumption. The collection center can rebut the presumption based on the household hazardous waste exemption.
 
04/01/1994Native American Network: A RCRA Information Exchange (Issue #5) (Spring/Summer 1994)Publication
 Description: This issue of the Native American Network focuses on EPAVISTA Alaska Project and its novel approach to solid waste management. Articles cover illegal dump sites on the Omaha Indian Reservation, an introduction to the new Office of Solid Waste Director, and household hazardous waste.
 
10/07/1993REGULATORY STATUS OF USED RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL AEROSOL CANSMemo
 Description: EPA is unable to determine if aerosol cans exhibit the characteristic of reactivity (D003). Emptying a steel aerosol can by puncturing and draining it may be exempt as a step in recycling the can as scrap metal. A steel aerosol can qualifies as scrap metal if it does not contain significant liquids (i.e., is fully drained) and is therefore exempt from regulation when sent for recycling. Aerosol cans may be rendered empty in accordance with 261.7. Liquid or gas removed from a can is hazardous waste if it is listed or characteristic. There is no need to determine if a steel aerosol can is empty once it qualifies as scrap metal (i.e., once it no longer contains significant liquids) that is destined for recycling. Aerosol cans generated by households qualify for household hazardous waste exclusion. The exclusion attaches at the point of generation and continues to apply throughout the waste management cycle.
 
10/07/1993REGULATORY STATUS OF USED RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL AEROSOL CANSMemo
 Description: Aerosol cans generated by households qualify for the household hazardous waste exclusion. The exclusion attaches at the point of generation and continues throughout the waste management cycle. Steel aerosol cans are scrap metal when they are recycled if they do not contain significant liquids. There is no need to determine if a steel aerosol can is empty once it qualifies as scrap metal. Emptying an aerosol can by puncturing and draining may be exempt as a step in the recycling of the can as scrap metal. EPA is unable to determine if aerosol cans exhibit the characteristic of reactivity (D003). Liquid or gas removed from a can is hazardous waste if it is listed or characteristic. Aerosol cans may be emptied in accordance with 261.7.
 
08/15/1993Household Hazardous Waste Management: A Manual for One-Day Community Collection ProgramsPublication
 Description: This document helps communities plan for one-day, drop-off household hazardous waste (HHW) collection programs and provides community leaders with guidance on all aspects of planning, organizing, and publicizing an HHW collection program.
 
07/14/1993RESPONSE TO REQUEST FOR OPINION ON SECTION 21 PETITION ON BATTERY DEPOSITSMemo
 Description: The toxicity characteristic (TC) is designed to identify wastes that may pose a risk to human health and the environment under a reasonable worst-case mismanagement scenario. Some spent batteries (battery) would fail the toxicity characteristic for lead (D008), cadmium (D006), and mercury (D009). Batteries may be eligible for the universal waste regulations. Batteries generated by households and conditionally exempt small quantity generators (CESQGs) are generally exempt from Subtitle C regulation.
 
06/01/1993Reusable News (Summer/Fall 1993)Publication
 Description: This issue of Reusable News describes how recycling offers opportunities for economic development. It also includes articles about grocery store composting, paper procurement guidelines, household hazardous waste conference, bottle deposit systems, degradable ring rule, extension of small landfills, Trashasaurus Rex, and international packaging legislation.
 
04/19/1993DISCUSSION PAPER ON POSSIBLE UNIVERSAL WASTEMemo
 Description: EPA is evaluating the applicability of the household hazardous waste (HHW) exclusion to lead-based paint abatement wastes (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 70233, 70241; 12/18/98). Part 279 prohibits the storage of used oil in unlined surface impoundments and applying used oil to roads. Fluorescent bulbs may be conditionally exempt in the future. EPA does not believe that F001-F005 solvents should be included as universal wastes. EPA is currently studying other solvent wastes to determine if they merit a listing (SEE ALSO: 61 FR 42318; 8/14/96). Spent antifreeze may exhibit the toxicity characteristic for lead and/or benzene. EPA is evaluating toxicity characteristic levels for lead and pentachlorophenol (PCP). New MCLs could affect future toxicity characteristic levels. Sandblast grit from the removal of lead-based paint may be D008.
 
04/15/1993Household Hazardous Waste: Steps to Safe ManagementPublication
 Description: This document describes household hazardous waste and the dangers of improper disposal and urges homeowners to reuse, recycle, and properly manage household hazardous waste.
 
09/18/1992EXEMPTION FOR MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION ASH FROM HAZARDOUS WASTE REGULATIONMemo
 Description: Municipal waste combustion ash is exempt household hazardous waste pursuant to RCRA 3001(i) (SEE ALSO: RPC# 10/1/94-02; 59 FR 29372; 6/7/94; 60 FR 6666; 2/3/95 and RPC# 3/22/95-01).
 
09/16/1992RCRA STATUS OF LEAD-BASED PAINT ABATEMENT DEBRIS AND LEAD PAINT CONTAINING DEMOLITION DEBRISMemo
 Description: Revising the toxicity characteristic levels for lead based on groundwater modeling, rather than extraction procedure levels, would result in most lead-based paint abatement wastes no longer testing hazardous. The revision of the toxicity characteristic level for lead may occur as part of Hazardous Waste Identification Rule. EPA considered extending the household hazardous waste exclusion to lead-based paint (LBP) abatement wastes from renovation (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 70233, 70241; 12/18/98).
 
09/04/1992STATUS OF FLUORESCENT LAMPS UNDER RCRAMemo
 Description: CESQG or household hazardous waste (HHW) fluorescent light bulbs may be land disposed in Subtitle D landfill regardless of characteristic properties. Land disposal restrictions (LDR) do not apply to D009 mercury-containing fluorescent light bulbs that pass the extraction procedure (EP) test (SUPERSEDED: see 63 FR 28556; 5/26/98). The bulbs are subject to LDR because they exhibit the EP toxicity characteristic and toxicity characteristic (TC), and could be considered debris per 268.45.
 
07/22/1992RCRA SUBTITLE C REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE COLLECTION PROGRAMS COLLECTING CESQG WASTEMemo
 Description: CESQG wastes managed by state-approved Household Hazardous Waste Collection programs may be mixed with nonhazardous waste (e.g., household hazardous waste) and remain subject to the CESQG requirements, even if the mixture exhibits a characteristic. Collection programs that handle the commingled waste are subject to CESQG regulations. CESQGs who mix hazardous and nonhazardous waste and whose resultant mixtures exceed the 261.5(h) quantity limit and exhibit a characteristic are subject to 262 generator regulations.
 
07/17/1992REGULATORY STATUS OF POLYURETHANE FOAMS CONTAINING CFC-11 REMOVED FROM APPLIANCESMemo
 Description: Appliances collected from households are household hazardous waste (HHW). Material removed from an appliance that qualifies as HHW is also exempt. 261.2(f) documentation requirements apply to conditionally exempt small quantity generator (CESQG) wastes. Provides a summary of the regulations proposed pursuant to 608 of CAA designed to limit the emissions of ozone-depleting compounds.
 
03/01/1992Reusable News (Spring 1992)Publication
 Description: This issue of Reusable News features a cover story on how recycling helps the homeless to a better life. It also includes articles about waste prevention successes, McDonald's waste reduction program, how the Keep America Beautiful handbook promotes waste prevention and recycling, the increase in household hazardous waste collection programs by over 70 percent, and a Midwest conference that looks at procurement of recycled goods.
 
12/19/1991USED AUTOMOBILE ANTIFREEZE DISPOSALMemo
 Description: Used antifreeze from households is exempt from regulation. Used antifreeze from business is hazardous waste only if characteristic. Small business may be able to enjoy the reduced CESQG regulation. Industry data indicates used antifreeze may fail TCLP.
 
11/12/1991APPLICABILITY OF SPECIAL COLLECTION SYSTEM PROPOSAL TO BATTERIESMemo
 Description: Hazardous waste batteries (battery) generated by households are not subject to regulations. Batteries generated by a CESQG are subject to limited controls. Until EPA develops special management standards for recycling hazardous waste batteries, generators must still determine whether used nickel-cadmium batteries exhibit the toxicity characteristic (SEE ALSO: Part 273).
 
06/21/1991BAGHOUSE DUSTS USED AS, OR TO PRODUCE, AGGREGATEMemo
 Description: Baghouse dust used as a product or reclaimed as an ingredient in a product (e.g., aggregate) placed on the land is a solid waste and is not exempt per 261.2(e). Products reclaimed from K061 that are not placed on the land are no longer wastes. Discusses the indigenous principle (SUPERSEDED: see 266.100) and the elements of legitimate recycling. If it is not legitimate recycling, the kiln is hazardous waste treatment unit.
 
06/20/1991USE OF PETROLEUM-CONTAMINATED SOILS AS AN INGREDIENT IN ASPHALT BATCHINGMemo
 Description: Soil contaminated with listed or characteristic crude oil used in asphalt batching is a solid waste since it is used in manner constituting disposal, unless the crude oil or CCP is a normal ingredient in asphalt batching, or until it meets terms of 266.20(b). Soil may be exempt under 261.4(b)(10). Contaminated soils used in asphalt batching that contain hazardous constituents in significantly higher concentrations than that of analogous raw materials may be considered sham recycling. Includes criteria for evaluating whether a waste is legitimately being recycled.
 
05/30/1991HOUSEHOLD WASTE EXCLUSION SCOPEMemo
 Description: Hazardous waste nickel-cadmium batteries (battery) generated by consumers in their homes are within the household hazardous waste exclusion. Batteries removed by service centers are not within the exemption (SEE ALSO: Part 273).
 
05/01/1991REGULATION OF MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION (MWC) ASHQuestion & Answer
 Description: The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 established a two-year exemption for characteristic combustion ash from municipal waste incinerators. The two-year moratorium covered fly and/or bottom ash from both energy recovery and municipal incinerators (SUPERSEDED: October 1, 1994, MRQ, “Status of Municipal Waste Combustion (MWC) Ash”; 59 FR 29372; June 7, 1994; 60 FR 6666; February 3, 1995, and RPC# 3/22/95-01).
 
11/28/1990PROPER DISPOSAL OF OLD MEDICATIONSMemo
 Description: Household medications may be classified as household hazardous wastes and exempt from Subtitle C regulation. Disposal to the publicly owned treatment works (POTW) may be appropriate for household hazardous waste and is excluded via domestic sewage exclusion. [SUPERCEDED: EPA generally considers sewer disposal inadvisable for pharmaceuticals and discourages this practice, unless specifically required by the label (73 FR 73525).]
 
09/20/1990SQG COMPLIANCE WITH TC RULEMemo
 Description: A fuel oil leak from a household tank is exempt household hazardous waste (HHW). EPA does not determine if a particular waste is characteristic. The hazardous waste determination is the generator’s responsibility. SQGs that are newly subject due to the toxicity characteristic (TC) rule had until 11/2/90 to notify the region. SQGs were granted an additional three months to comply with the TC Rule. Spilled petroleum products that are reclaimed from contaminated soil and used to produce fuels are not solid wastes.
 
05/09/1990CHEMICAL WEAPON AGENT RELEASEMemo
 Description: Human remains and personal effects contaminated with chemical weapons are considered exempt household hazardous waste. Medical waste regulations exclude human corpses, remains, and anatomical parts that are intended for interment or cremation (SUPERSEDED: see 60 FR 33912; 6/29/95).
 
04/20/1990CLASSIFYING MERCURY-CONTAINING PAINTS AS HAZARDOUS WASTESMemo
 Description: Mercury-containing paint discarded by homeowners is exempt household HW. Mercury-containing latex paint usually exhibits the toxicity characteristic when properly tested. The statement that paint will not exhibit mercury characteristic unless concentration exceeds 540 ppm is incorrect.
 
03/01/1990APPLICABILITY OF THE HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE EXCLUSION TO WASTE GENERATED BY CONTRACTORSQuestion & Answer
 Description: Discusses two criteria for the household hazardous waste (HHW) exclusion. Construction, renovation, and demolition waste generated at household would not qualify for HHW exclusion (SUPERSEDED: see RPC# 7/31/00-01). There is no distinction between HHW generated by a homeowner and HHW generated at home by a contractor. Waste generated as part of routine residential maintenance by contractor is exempt HHW (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 70233, 70241; December 18, 1998).
 
11/28/1989CALIFORNIA LIST HOC LAND BAN REGULATIONSMemo
 Description: Household hazardous waste (HHW) regulated on the state level is not subject to the Federal land disposal restrictions (LDR) program. Nonliquid waste containing one halogenated organic compound (HOC) must be incinerated unless a more specific treatment standard exists for the HOC. Nonliquid wastes with multiple HOCs must be incinerated unless a specific treatment standard has been established for at least one HOC in waste (SUPERSEDED: California list removed, see 62 FR 25997; 5/12/97).
 
05/01/1989MEDICAL WASTE - HOUSEHOLD MEDICAL WASTEQuestion & Answer
 Description: Medical waste generated in private homes by health care providers is exempt household hazardous waste, even when removed from the home and transported to a physician’s place of business (SEE ALSO: 60 FR 33912; 6/29/95).
 
04/26/1989RECYCLING OF ELECTROPLATING SLUDGES (F006) FOR CEMENT/AGGREGATE MANUFACTUREMemo
 Description: Discussion of sham recycling. Lists criteria to be used in deciding whether processing of secondary material is legitimate recycling or regulated hazardous waste treatment and sham recycling. Cement kiln dust (CKD) generated when F006 is used as ingredient is only exempt if CKD chemical makeup is not significantly affected by the use of hazardous waste (SUPERSEDED: see 266.112). F006 destined for use as ingredient in aggregate, cement, or other products to be placed on the land is regulated as a hazardous waste from the point of generation forward until 266.20(b) is satisfied. Smelting or recovering metals from F006 is not subject to regulation (SEE ALSO: Part 266, Subpart H). Smelter slag residue from F006 metal recovery is hazardous waste via derived-from rule (SEE ALSO: 261.3(c)(2)(ii), 266.20(c), and 59 FR 67256; 12/29/94).
 
02/07/1989DROSS FROM ALUMINUM SMELTING USED IN MANUFACTURE OF CEMENTMemo
 Description: The 261.4(b)(7) Bevill exclusion covers wastes from processing ores when the feedstock to smelter is greater than 50% ore or mineral. Feedstock of greater than 50% scrap aluminum would not qualify. Aluminum dross is a by-product. Discussion of use of dross in the manufacture of cement as reclamation. If cement or aluminum dross by-product will be placed on the land or in a product that will be placed on the land, the material is a solid and hazardous waste subject to Part 266, Subpart C and must meet land disposal restrictions (LDR) treatment standards. Discussion of sham recycling (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 28556; 5/26/98).
 
11/01/1988HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE -- COLLECTION PROGRAMS, CLARIFICATION OF ISSUESMemo
 Description: Household hazardous waste (HHW) collection programs are exempt. HHW mixed with CESQG waste is subject to 261.5. The exemption also covers dioxin-bearing HHW.
 
09/30/1988AEROSOL CANS, ON-SITE DEPRESSURIZATION OFMemo
 Description: The region is in the best position to determine if aerosol cans are hazardous waste. Generally, cans are hazardous if they contain a listed or characteristic CCP and are not empty per 261.7 and/or if the cans themselves exhibit a characteristic. The region determines if depressurizing aerosol cans meets the definition of treatment. Waste aerosol cans generated in military housing are exempt household hazardous waste (HHW).
 
06/01/1988HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTEQuestion & Answer
 Description: Carbon filters installed in homes by a firm as part of a corrective action consent decree are excluded household wastes when collected by the firm and sent for regeneration even though they contain listed waste.
 
05/02/1988DEFINITION OF “HOUSEHOLD WASTE” AND “SCRAP METAL”Memo
 Description: Household-type wastes from other services (i.e. commercial facilities, office buildings) are not covered under the household hazardous waste exclusion. Metal parts that meet the definition of scrap metal in 261.1(c)(6) are not subject to Subtitle C regulation when recycled (SEE ALSO: 261.4(a)(13) exclusion for processed scrap metal).
 
02/22/1988LETTER TO STATE ENVIRONMENTAL COMMISSIONERS: SUBTITLE D STATE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANSMemo
 Description: RCRA 4005(c)(1) requires states to develop and implement permit programs for facilities that manage hazardous waste from CESQGs and households. EPA requests states to review and update municipal solid waste (MSW) management plans.
 
01/11/1988HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE EXCLUSIONMemo
 Description: There are no federal requirements for the transportation, treatment, storage, or disposal of household hazardous waste (HHW).
 
12/01/1987WASTE CLASSIFICATIONQuestion & Answer
 Description: Waste perchloroethylene from hotel dry cleaning is an exempt household waste if the hotel cleans only its customers’ clothing (SUPERSEDED: See RPC# 3/1/95-03).
 
11/20/1987LEAD-BASED PAINT RESIDUES AND CONTAMINATED SOILSMemo
 Description: Paint wastes are exempt household hazardous wastes (HHW) if they are generated by homeowners and not by contractors (SUPERSEDED: RPC# 3/1/90-06). HHW from federal agencies is not HHW. Certain material and soil contaminated with weathering lead based paint is characteristic for lead. If characteristic soil is actively managed, it is a hazardous waste. Discusses lead paint remediation methods (SEE ALSO: RPC# 3/7/95-01). A property owner is normally not required to characterize soil left on site. Addresses factors in determining if soil removal is required. On-site soil treatment needs a permit unless the generator is exempt (SEE ALSO: 61 FR 18779; 4/29/96).
 
08/13/1987USED CRANKCASE OIL DISPOSED OF BY DO-IT-YOURSELFERSMemo
 Description: Used oil disposed by “Do-It-Yourselfers” is exempt as household hazardous waste. No federal permits are required for used oil collection, transportation, recycling, or disposal (SEE ALSO: Part 279).
 
04/23/1987REGULATORY STATUS OF KITCHEN GREASE UNDER RCRAMemo
 Description: Restaurant waste qualifies as exempt household hazardous waste (SUPERSEDED: see RPC# 5/1/95-02).
 
04/01/1987WASTE DERIVED FROM TREATING EXEMPT OR EXCLUDED WASTESQuestion & Answer
 Description: Ash derived from burning CESQG waste is not exempt from hazardous waste regulation. Ash from burning household waste remains exempt (SUPERSEDED: See RPC#10/1/94-02). Ash from burning arsenical-treated wood is subject to regulation if it is characteristic. CESQG waste is hazardous waste, but is exempt from regulation.
 
03/17/1987RESIDUES FROM U.S. NAVY SALVAGE FUEL BOILERMemo
 Description: Ash from a U.S. Navy salvage fuel boiler plant is not eligible for the household hazardous waste exclusion. The Bevill exemption for fossil fuel combustion wastes includes ash generated from combustion of coal-waste mixtures where coal makes up more than 50% of the fuel mixture (SEE ALSO: see 266.112).
 
09/04/1986MERCURY DRY CELL BATTERIES AND APPLICABLE REGULATIONSMemo
 Description: Mercury dry cell batteries (battery) that exhibit a characteristic are hazardous waste (HW) and must be managed by a HW management TSDF, unless they are household hazardous waste (HHW) or a CESQG waste (SEE ALSO: Part 273).
 
07/11/1986LEAD-ACID BATTERY IMPROPER DISPOSALMemo
 Description: An individual consumer may dispose of lead-acid batteries (battery) (baunder household hazardous waste (HHW) exemption). EPA regulates storage of lead-acid batteries by the reclaimer prior to the reclamation, but not the generation, storage, or transportation by other persons (SEE ALSO: Part 273).
 
04/21/1986DRY CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES WASTE NOT EXCLUDED AS HOUSEHOLD WASTEMemo
 Description: Dry cleaning/vehicle maintenance wastes from hotels are not household hazardous waste (HHW). Normal household waste from hotels is excluded. Room cleaning, pesticide spraying of hotel rooms yields HHW.
 
01/28/1986HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE COLLECTION PROGRAMS, CERCLA AND RCRA LIABILITY OF MUNICIPAL SPONSORS OFMemo
 Description: Household hazardous waste (HHW) is excluded from Subtitle C regulation even if accumulated in quantities that would otherwise be regulated, or when transported, treated, disposed. Household waste mixed with other regulated waste is regulated. There is no exemption from CERCLA liability. EPA may use enforcement discretion.
 
01/11/1985LANDFILL GAS CONDENSATE, REGULATION OFMemo
 Description: Landfill gas condensate from a landfill containing listed wastes is listed. Condensate from municipal waste or characteristic waste is hazardous only if it is characteristic. Condensate from household waste only is exempt. The household hazardous waste (HHW) exclusion applies to household hazardous waste being collected, treated, disposed, and its resulting residues.
 
04/19/1984HOUSEHOLD WASTES - DISPOSAL OF CARBON-ZINC BATTERIESMemo
 Description: Batteries (battery) from households are exempt as household hazardous waste. Carbon-zinc batteries pose little threat to the environment. Batteries which are hazardous (nickel-cadmium, mercury) are generally not disposed of in large numbers by households.
 
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