Skip common site navigation and headers
US EPA
RCRA Online
Begin Hierarchical Links You are here: EPA Home >> Wastes >> Information Sources >> RCRA Online >> Topics Search End Hierarchical Links
Welcome What's New Topics Full Text Search Advanced Search Help

Topics Search

Click on the blue carat to the left of a Topic, the list will expand to show the documents related to the selected Topic.

Show details for Air Emissions (RCRA)Air Emissions (RCRA)
Show details for BatteriesBatteries
Show details for Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT)Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT)
Show details for Bevill AmendmentBevill Amendment
Show details for BoilersBoilers
Show details for BurningBurning
Show details for Buy RecycledBuy Recycled
Show details for Characteristic WastesCharacteristic Wastes
Show details for Chemicals (RCRA)Chemicals (RCRA)
Show details for CleanupCleanup
Show details for Cleanup (RCRA)Cleanup (RCRA)
Show details for Closure (Hazardous Waste)Closure (Hazardous Waste)
Show details for CombustionCombustion
Show details for Combustion of Hazardous WasteCombustion of Hazardous Waste
Show details for ComplianceCompliance
Show details for CompostingComposting
Show details for Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generators (CESQG)Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generators (CESQG)
Show details for Construction and Demolition WasteConstruction and Demolition Waste
Show details for Construction and Demolition WastesConstruction and Demolition Wastes
Show details for ContainersContainers
Show details for Containment BuildingsContainment Buildings
Show details for Corrective Action (RCRA)Corrective Action (RCRA)
Show details for Corrosive WastesCorrosive Wastes
Show details for Crude OilCrude Oil
Show details for Delisting PetitionsDelisting Petitions
Show details for DisposalDisposal
Show details for Drip PadsDrip Pads
Show details for Educational MaterialsEducational Materials
Show details for Enforcement (RCRA)Enforcement (RCRA)
Show details for EPA FormsEPA Forms
Show details for Exclusions (RCRA)Exclusions (RCRA)
Show details for ExportsExports
Show details for F-wastesF-wastes
Show details for Financial Assurance (hazardous waste)Financial Assurance (hazardous waste)
Show details for Financial Assurance (nonhazardous waste)Financial Assurance (nonhazardous waste)
Show details for GasGas
Show details for GeneratorsGenerators
Show details for Grants (hazardous Waste)Grants (hazardous Waste)
Show details for Grants (municipal solid waste)Grants (municipal solid waste)
Show details for Groundwater MonitoringGroundwater Monitoring
Show details for Hazardous WasteHazardous Waste
Show details for Hazardous waste dataHazardous waste data
Show details for Hazardous Waste IdentificationHazardous Waste Identification
Show details for Hazardous Waste RecyclingHazardous Waste Recycling
Show details for Household Hazardous WasteHousehold Hazardous Waste
Show details for Identification of Hazardous WasteIdentification of Hazardous Waste
Show details for ImportsImports
Show details for IncinerationIncineration
Show details for IncineratorsIncinerators
Show details for Industrial FurnacesIndustrial Furnaces
Show details for Industrial WastesIndustrial Wastes
Show details for Jobs Through Recycling ProgramJobs Through Recycling Program
Show details for K-wastesK-wastes
Show details for Land Disposal RestrictionsLand Disposal Restrictions
Show details for Land Disposal UnitsLand Disposal Units
Show details for Land Treatment UnitsLand Treatment Units
Show details for LandfillsLandfills
Show details for Large Quantity Generators (LQG)Large Quantity Generators (LQG)
Show details for Legislation (hazardous waste)Legislation (hazardous waste)
Show details for Liability (Hazardous Waste)Liability (Hazardous Waste)
Show details for Listing Hazardous WasteListing Hazardous Waste
Show details for ManifestManifest
Show details for Medical WasteMedical Waste
Show details for Mercury WastesMercury Wastes
Show details for Military MunitionsMilitary Munitions
Show details for Mining WasteMining Waste
Show details for Miscellaneous UnitsMiscellaneous Units
Show details for Mixed Waste (radioactive waste)Mixed Waste (radioactive waste)
Show details for Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste
Show details for Native American - TribesNative American - Tribes
Show details for Native Americans - TribesNative Americans - Tribes
Show details for Natural GasNatural Gas
Show details for Nonhazardous WasteNonhazardous Waste
Show details for OilOil
Show details for Oil FiltersOil Filters
Show details for P-wastesP-wastes
Show details for PCBsPCBs
Show details for Permits and PermittingPermits and Permitting
Show details for PetitionsPetitions
Show details for Petroleum Refining WastesPetroleum Refining Wastes
Show details for Polychorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)Polychorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
Show details for Post-closure (hazardous waste)Post-closure (hazardous waste)
Show details for ProcurementProcurement
Show details for Public ParticipationPublic Participation
Show details for Radioactive Mixed WasteRadioactive Mixed Waste
Show details for Reactive WastesReactive Wastes
Show details for RecyclingRecycling
Show details for Reducing WasteReducing Waste
Show details for Siting (waste facilities)Siting (waste facilities)
Show details for Small Quantity Generators (SQG)Small Quantity Generators (SQG)
Show details for Solid WasteSolid Waste
Show details for SolventsSolvents
Show details for Source ReductionSource Reduction
Show details for Special WastesSpecial Wastes
Show details for State Programs (RCRA)State Programs (RCRA)
Show details for StorageStorage
Show details for Surface ImpoundmentsSurface Impoundments
Show details for TanksTanks
Show details for Test MethodsTest Methods
Show details for Toxicity CharacteristicToxicity Characteristic
Show details for TransportersTransporters
Show details for TreatmentTreatment
Show details for TSDFsTSDFs
Show details for U-wastesU-wastes
Show details for Underground Storage Tanks (UST)Underground Storage Tanks (UST)
Hide details for Universal WasteUniversal Waste
10/01/2011RCRA Orientation Manual 2011Publication
 Description: This manual provides introductory information on the solid and hazardous waste management programs under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Designed for EPA and state staff, members of the regulated community, and the general public who wish to better understand RCRA, this document constitutes a review of the RCRA program and is not a substitute for RCRA or its implementing regulations. This document updates the 2008 RCRA Orientation Manual (EPA530-R-07-010).
 
02/01/2009Fluorescent Lamp RecyclingPublication
 Description: This document provides information to businesses interested in recycling their spent mercury-containing lamps. Mercury-containing lamps include tubular and compact fluorescent lamps, high intensity discharge lamps (mercury vapor, metal halide, high pressure sodium), and fluorescent backlights in flat panel and liquid crystal displays commonly used as monitors, TVs and instrument displays. This document also provides Best Management Practices (BMPs) for the storage of spent fluorescent lamps and the use of drum-top crushers (DTCs) for compacting waste lamps.
 
12/01/2007RCRA Orientation Manual 2008Publication
 Description: This document updates the 2003 RCRA Orientation Manual (EPA530-R-06-003). This updated manual provides introductory information on the solid and hazardous waste management programs under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Designed for EPA and state staff, members of the regulated community, and the general public who wish to better understand RCRA, this document constitutes a review of the RCRA program and is not a substitute for RCRA or its implementing regulations.
 
02/02/2007DELETION OF THE DEFINITION FOR “ON-SITE” FROM 40 CFR 273.9Memo
 Description: Future editions of the CFR will contain the definition of “on-site” under 40 CFR 273.9.
 
08/24/2006Mercury Lamp Drum-Top Crusher StudyPublication
 Description: This document provides the most current information on the performance of mercury lamp drum-top crushing (DTC) devices. DTCs are used to improve waste lamp storage and transport, and reduce costs associated with lamp recycling. EPA believes that with this information, states, users of mercury-containing lamps, and lamp recyclers will be able to make more informed decisions when managing fluorescent lamps. The preamble to the January 6, 2000, mercury lamp rule identifies lamp crushing as RCRA treatment and specifically prohibits the use of DTCs for management of fluorescent lamps as universal waste unless an equivalency determination is made. The purpose of the study is to make information available to states and regions that could eventually be used to provide "a demonstration of equivalency to the federal prohibition [on treatment of universal waste without a permit] (64 FR 36466, 36478; January 6, 2000).
 
06/08/2006GUIDANCE FOR GENERATORS DISPOSING OF FULLY-DISCHARGED LITHIUM SULFUR DIOXIDE BATTERIESMemo
 Description: A fully discharged lithium sulfur dioxide battery would have zero volts and would be unlikely to exhibit the reactivity characteristic. Lithium sulfur dioxide batteries that have been discharged using a Complete Discharge Device (CDD) to a voltage of one volt per cell or less are unlikely to be reactive. Discharge of batteries to remove the electric charge is an acceptable waste management practice under the universal waste rule. Batteries are considered hazardous waste at the time of removal from service. Generators, transporters, and consolidation points managing universal waste are required to comply with the land disposal restrictions (LDR). If lithium sulfur dioxide batteries are reasonably expected to contain underlying hazardous constituents (UHCs) above its universal treatment standard (UTS) level, the UHC must be treated to the UTS level before land disposal. Once batteries have been discharged and are no longer characteristic hazardous waste, it is not necessary to treat UHCs at a RCRA-permitted facility. Decharacterized universal waste meeting LDR requirements, including applicable UTS for UHCs, can be managed as nonhazardous waste and may be sent to a municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF).
 
07/01/2005Environmental Fact Sheet: Mercury-Containing Equipment Classified as Universal WastePublication
 Description: This fact sheet discusses the August 5, 2005, final rule that adds mercury-containing equipment to the list of universal wastes (70 FR 45508). The universal waste regulations provide streamlined management requirements tailored to several different kinds of waste. Although the proposed rule from June 12, 2002 (67 FR 40507), also addressed cathode-ray tubes (CRTs), the portion of the proposed rule that relates to CRTs will be finalized at a later date.
 
01/01/2005APPLICABILITY OF THE EXPORT REGULATIONS TO UNIVERSAL WASTEMemo
 Description: Large quantity handlers exporting universal waste to foreign destinations without first sending waste to a consolidation point or destination facility must comply with Part 262, Subpart E, even though a manifest is not required (SEE ALSO: 61 FR 16290, 16306; 4/12/96). Also includes a discussion of notification, annual reporting, and recordkeeping regulatory requirements.
 
07/01/2004CONTRACTORS AS COGENERATORS OF UNIVERSAL WASTE LAMPSMemo
 Description: A universal waste handler is a generator of universal waste or the owner or operator of a facility that receives universal waste from other universal waste handlers. A generator is any person, by site, whose act or process first causes hazardous waste to become subject to regulation. The contractor that actually removes the universal waste lamps from service is considered a handler and the generator of waste. Therefore, the school and the contractor would be cogenerators. Both cogenerators are jointly and severally liable as universal waste handlers. EPA recommends that cogenerators should mutually agree to have one party perform the generator duties.
 
09/01/2002BROKEN BATTERIES AS UNIVERSAL WASTESQuestion & Answer
 Description: Universal waste handlers may manage broken or damaged hazardous waste batteries as universal waste if the breakage or damage does not constitute a breach in the cell casing. Universal waste batteries are intended to be intact. Universal waste handlers must contain any universal waste battery that shows evidence of leakage, spillage, or damage that could cause leakage under reasonably foreseeable conditions in a container, which is closed, structurally sound, compatible with the battery's contents, and capable of enclosing potential releases (SEE ALSO: 60 FR 25492, 25522; 5/11/95). States may have additional or more stringent requirements.
 
04/01/2002UNIVERSAL WASTE EMPLOYEE TRAINING REQUIREMENTSQuestion & Answer
 Description: Universal waste handlers are not required to conduct an annual review of initial employee training. Universal waste handlers only need to comply with the employee training requirements in Part 273. Handlers must only provide annual training reviews if they are also large quantity generators (LQGs) of hazardous waste.
 
06/01/2001UNIVERSAL WASTE RELEASE RESPONSEQuestion & Answer
 Description: The cleanup residue resulting from the spill of a universal waste pesticide must meet the Part 273 definition of a universal waste pesticide in order to be managed as a universal waste. If the cleanup residue does not meet the definition of a universal waste, it is subject to all applicable Subtitle C requirements if it is hazardous.
 
04/12/1999RECLAMATION OF FLUORESCENT LAMPSMemo
 Description: Unused mercury lamps are commercial chemical products (CCP) and not solid wastes if reclaimed. Used mercury lamps are spent materials. EPA is considering adding spent lamps to universal waste program (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99).
 
09/04/1998NOTICE OF CERTIFICATION OF ALTERNATIVE BATTERY LABELMemo
 Description: EPA approved new label for nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) rechargeable batteries in accordance with Mercury-Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management Act of 1996. The new label depicts battery surrounded by three chasing arrows with word “RECYCLE” above it (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 50569; 9/22/98).
 
08/18/1998ADDITION OF MERCURY-CONTAINING EQUIPMENT TO UNIVERSAL WASTE PROGRAMMemo
 Description: EPA has no plans to address petitions to add mercury-containing equipment to universal waste rule (SUPERCEDED: 70 FR 45508; 8/5/05). Universal waste rule explicitly provides flexibility for states to add other waste categories to their approved state program.
 
07/20/1998UNIVERSAL WASTE RULE - ENFORCEMENT ISSUES AND ADDITION OF STATE-ONLY UNIVERSAL WASTESMemo
 Description: EPA regions should take enforcement actions against universal waste handlers in states that are implementing the universal waste program but have not yet been authorized for those regulations only where handlers are not in full compliance with Part 273 standards. Where a state has added new wastes to its universal waste program before authorization, the EPA regions should extend this policy if it is determined that the additional wastes meet the criteria of 273.81.
 
05/01/1998UNIVERSAL WASTE HANDLER RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTSQuestion & Answer
 Description: Large quantity handlers of universal waste must track universal waste shipments received and/or sent off-site from the facility. Records must be kept for at least three years. The regulations do not require a specific recordkeeping form, but any standard business record (e.g., logs, invoices, bills of lading) will generally be sufficient. Small quantity handlers are not required to keep records of universal waste shipments.
 
04/01/1998UNIVERSAL WASTE TRANSFER FACILITY STORAGE TIME LIMITQuestion & Answer
 Description: A transporter who stores universal waste at a transfer facility for more than ten days meets the definition of a universal waste handler, and must comply with the universal waste handler requirements.
 
03/01/1998UNIVERSAL WASTE STORAGE TIME LIMITS AND MULTIPLE HANDLERS Question & Answer
 Description: If universal waste is transferred and accumulated by multiple handlers, each individual handler may utilize the one-year accumulation provisions since each location at which universal wastes are consolidated and/or collected is regulated as a separate handler.
 
11/01/1997Implementation of the Mercury-Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management ActPublication
 Description: This document explains the Mercury-Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management Act of 1996; provides information on successful recycling programs for rechargeable batteries; contains a summary of the Battery Act's requirements, as well as a summary of state and federal requirements affecting battery recycling prior to passage of the Battery Act; specifies why proper disposal or recycling is necessary for nickel and cadmium (Ni-Cd) and small sealed lead acid (SSLA) batteries; and defines roles that state and local governments, retailers, businesses, and public agencies can play in establishing recycling programs. The document also includes sources of additional information and a list of references.
 
10/31/1997IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MERCURY CONTAINING AND RECHARGEABLE BATTERY MANAGEMENT ACTMemo
 Description: Section 104(a) of the Mercury Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management Act implements the federal Universal Waste (UW) rule as the management standard for batteries, regardless of state laws. Section 104(b) of the Act requires states wishing to regulate batteries to adopt provisions identical to those of the UW rule. Electrolyte removal is an activity specifically allowed of UW handlers, therefore regulation of electrolyte removal by any state is preempted by the Act.
 
10/09/1997ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES FOR MANAGING SPENT MERCURY CONTAINING LAMPSMemo
 Description: The July 27, 1994, Federal Register (59 FR 38288) presents two alternative approaches for managing spent mercury containing lamps: a conditional exclusion from hazardous waste regulations and adding the lamps to the universal waste regulations. A notice announcing the availability of the mercury emissions analysis for public review and comment was published on July 11, 1997 (62 FR 37183) (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99).
 
09/02/1997EXTENSION OF COMMENT PERIOD FOR MERCURY EMISSIONS STUDYMemo
 Description: The Agency will provide an additional 45 days beyond the initial comment period on the mercury emissions study to allow stakeholders more time to review the study and submit comments. The extended comment period will end on October 9, 1997.
 
08/12/1997RELEASE OF EPA’S MERCURY REPORTMemo
 Description: Announces the release of the report to Congress on the risks associated with mercury exposures (developed pursuant to the Clean Air Act) will be delayed to further evaluate the health and environmental effects. Describes conditional exclusion and universal waste management options for mercury lamps proposed in the July 27, 1994, Federal Register (59 FR 38288) (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99). The primary sources of mercury released from spent lamps are air releases from incineration and breakage.
 
07/31/1997ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES FOR MANAGING SPENT MERCURY-CONTAINING LAMPSMemo
 Description: The July 27, 1994, Federal Register (59 FR 38288) presents two alternative approaches for managing spent mercury containing lamps: a conditional exclusion from hazardous waste regulations and adding the lamps to the universal waste regulations (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99). A notice announcing the availability of the mercury emissions analysis for public review and comment was published on July 11, 1997 (62 FR 37183). The findings of the analysis indicate that the primary sources of mercury released from spent lamps are air releases from incineration and breakage.
 
07/11/1997RELEASE OF MERCURY EMISSIONS STUDY FOR PUBLIC COMMENTMemo
 Description: Announces the release of the mercury emissions study for public comment. The study describes mercury emissions from a range of lamp management options including a conditional exclusion from hazardous waste regulations and management under universal waste regulations. These options were proposed in the July 17, 1994, Federal Register (59 FR 38288) (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99).
 
05/29/1997PETITION TO ADD WASTES TO THE UNIVERSAL WASTE PROGRAMMemo
 Description: EPA has no plans to address Utility Solid Waste Activities Group’s (USWAG) petitions to add mercury-containing equipment, paint, and paint-related wastes to the universal waste (UW) rule in 1997. The universal waste rule explicitly provides flexibility for states to add other waste categories to their approved state program. EPA established the workgroup to reduce the burden of the current manifest system. The workgroup’s proposal to allow generators to consolidate waste at central locations would cover utility access residuals.
 
05/16/1997COLLECTION AND RECYCLING OF HOUSEHOLD BATTERIESMemo
 Description: EPA does not have the authority to require battery manufacturers to take back their products for recycling once they are used. EPA may not require states or local communities to collect and recycle used batteries. This memo summarizes the Mercury-Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management Act. The Act removed obstacles to a voluntary industry take-back system. EPA is aware of a voluntary industry take-back system for the nationwide collection and recycling of Ni-Cd (Ni-Cad) batteries.
 
05/13/1997LABELING REQUIREMENTS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE BATTERIESMemo
 Description: Handlers of universal waste may place labels as prescribed in Section 273.34(a) on shrink-wrapped pallets of batteries rather than on each individual battery. A shrink-wrapped unit is a portable device (i.e., a container) for the purposes of Section 273.34(a). If the batteries show evidence of leakage or spillage after they have been shrink-wrapped, the shrink-wrapped unit must be placed in a container which can prevent release to the environment and the new container must be relabeled. Shrink-wrapped units may not meet DOT packaging specifications.
 
05/01/1997UNIVERSAL WASTE HANDLER STATUSQuestion & Answer
 Description: A small quantity handler of universal waste (SQHUW) who accumulates 5000 kg or more of universal waste at their location at any one time becomes a large quantity handler of universal waste (LQHUW) for the rest of the calendar year. The handler can reevaluate LQHUW status in the following calendar year. LQHUWs are subject to additional regulation, including obtaining an EPA ID number, ensuring that personnel are familiar with proper waste handling and emergency procedures, and recordkeeping.
 
02/13/1997UNIVERSAL WASTE QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS DOCUMENTMemo
 Description: Presents a Universal Waste Questions and Answers Document. Addresses state authorization. Discusses the addition of wastes to the federal and state universal waste (UW) programs, fluorescent lamps (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99), land disposal restrictions (LDR) recordkeeping requirements, the Mercury-Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management Act, batteries, pesticide collection programs, liability and enforcement, storage limits, mixtures of UW and hazardous waste, and manifesting.
 
02/07/1997MANAGEMENT OF SPENT FLUORESCENT LAMPSMemo
 Description: EPA is currently completing an analysis of estimated mercury emissions associated with managing spent fluorescent lamps. EPA will use the analysis in conjunction with comments on the proposed lamp rule (59 FR 38288; July 24, 1994) to determine how to proceed with a final regulatory decision on lamps (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99).
 
02/01/1997UNIVERSAL WASTE CONSOLIDATION POINT REGULATIONQuestion & Answer
 Description: A facility that consolidates or collects universal waste from generators or other handlers meets the definition of a universal waste handler, provided the waste is sent on to other handlers, recyclers, or treatment or disposal facilities. If a facility has several locations that serve as consolidation points, each location is regulated as a separate handler. Additional RCRA requirements may apply if the facility is also handling other types of hazardous waste (i.e., non-universal waste).
 
11/25/1996MERCURY-CONTAINING AND RECHARGEABLE BATTERY MANAGEMENT ACTMemo
 Description: The Mercury-Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management Act is effective nationwide on May 13, 1996. Two goals are to limit mercury (Hg) content in consumer batteries, and to promote recycling and proper disposal of used rechargeable nickel cadmium (NiCad) batteries, sealed small lead-acid batteries, and other widely used rechargeable batteries. Law limits Hg content of batteries and prohibits the sale of some Hg-containing batteries. Law requires uniform labeling and requires that collection, storage, and transportation be in accordance with the Universal Waste (UW) standards of Part 273. Law prohibits states from imposing standards not identical to UW standards. Law is not an amendment to RCRA. EPA is investigating implications on RCRA state authorization and is developing a codification rule.
 
05/01/1996FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON THE UNIVERSAL WASTE REGULATIONSQuestion & Answer
 Description: The universal waste (UW) regulations cover hazardous waste batteries (battery), pesticides, and mercury-containing thermostats (SEE ALSO: 70 FR 45508; 8/5/05). Wastes (e.g., fluorescent mercury lamps) may be added to the UW system (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99). Spent lead-acid batteries may be handled under Part 266, Subpart G, or under Part 273. There are no specific provisions for satellite accumulation of UW. Only large quantity handlers of universal waste (LQHUW) must submit a one-time written notification and obtain an EPA identification number. Handlers may accumulate universal waste at or near point of generation for up to 1 year.
 
04/10/1996UNIVERSAL WASTE RULE - IMPLEMENTATIONMemo
 Description: EPA encourages the timely development of universal waste (UW) collection systems, and encourages states to quickly adopt the UW rule. UW rule authorization is a high priority. If a state adopts the UW rule, but is not authorized, the Region should enforce only if there is non-compliance with Part 273 standards. EPA may choose to use 7003 authority for UW management that causes imminent and substantial endangerment (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99).
 
02/05/1996UNIVERSAL WASTE NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTSMemo
 Description: Large quantity handlers of universal waste (LQHUW) may fulfill the notification requirement by sending a one-time written notification or submitting an 8700-12 form. There is no national requirement to track this information in RCRIS (NOTE: RCRIS data was replaced by RCRAinfo data in Summer, 2000).
 
02/01/1996Reglamento de Residuos Universales (Spanish - The Universal Waste Rule Brochure)Publication
 Description: Spanish version of The Universal Waste Rule: Brochure. This flyer provides an overview of EPA’s Universal Waste Rule which is designed to reduce the amount of hazardous waste in the municipal solid waste stream, encourage recycling and proper disposal of certain common hazardous wastes, and reduce the regulatory burden on businesses that generate these wastes. The document includes an overview of what universal wastes are, who is affected by the rule, and the states role in implementation.
 
12/01/1995LEAD-ACID BATTERIES AND UNIVERSAL WASTEQuestion & Answer
 Description: Lead-acid batteries (battery) that are managed under Part 266, Subpart G, are not subject to the universal waste management standards under Part 273.
 
11/30/1995SAFE MANAGEMENT OF FLUORESCENT LAMPSMemo
 Description: EPA agrees that it is important to support the goals of the Green Lights Program. EPA received over 300 comments on the proposed mercury-containing fluorescent lamp rule (59 FR 38288; 7/27/94) (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99). States can add lamps to their own lists of universal wastes and set regulatory controls. States may have more stringent laws and policies than the federal program.
 
06/22/1995DETERMINATION ON WHETHER A GENERATOR'S FLUORESCENT TUBES ARE NONHAZARDOUSMemo
 Description: A generator is responsible for determining if a waste exhibits a characteristic. Testing one spent fluorescent mercury lamp tube to determine if all waste lamps exhibit the characteristic is not representative sampling. Selection of randomly chosen bulbs is more appropriate (see Chapter 9, SW-846). States authorized for the universal waste (UW) rule may add lamps to the state UW list and set management standards (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99). The UW rule streamlines regulations for hazardous waste batteries (battery), pesticides, and mercury thermostats (SEE ALSO: 70 FR 45508; 8/5/05).
 
06/05/1995GUIDANCE FROM THE U.S. EPA ON THE CRUSHING OF MERCURY-CONTAINING LAMPSMemo
 Description: Crushing mercury lamps can be part of an exempt legitimate recycling process. The recycling exemption can apply even if portions of recycling are performed at different sites. A crusher carries the burden to ensure bulbs are actually recycled (SUPERSEDED: lamp crushing by universal waste handlers prohibited; see 64 FR 36466, 36477-36478; 7/6/99). EPA is still weighing options proposed in the 7/27/94 Federal Register (59 FR 38288) for streamlining fluorescent lamp regulation. The universal waste rule streamlines the regulations for hazardous waste batteries (battery), pesticides, and mercury thermostats (SEE ALSO: 70 FR 45508; 8/5/05). States may add additional wastes (e.g., fluorescent lamps) to the state universal waste list and establish management standards.
 
09/28/1994CLARIFICATION ON WHEN USED MERCURY RELAYS/SWITCHES BECOME SPENTMemo
 Description: Mercury switches taken out of service and reclaimed are spent materials and solid wastes (SW). Sending a mercury switch for further use as a relay or switch is the continued use of a product. The actual management of a material rather than the potential of a material for a particular end use determines if it is a SW. Whether a switch is spent or directly reusable is determined when it is removed from service. Out-of-date drugs are off-specification CCPs and not a SW when returned to the pharmaceutical manufacturer for reclamation. Persons may petition to include switches/relays as a universal waste (SEE ALSO: 70 FR 45508; 8/5/05).
 
07/15/1994Environmental Fact Sheet: Options Proposed for Managing Discarded Fluorescent and Other Lights That Contain MercuryPublication
 Description: This fact sheet discusses the proposed two options for managing spent mercury-containing lights, such as fluorescent bulbs and high intensity discharge lamps: (1) exclusion of mercury-containing lamps from regulation as hazardous waste if disposed of in certain municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs) or mercury-reclamation facilities (prohibits incineration in municipal waste combustors); (2) addition of mercury-containing lamps to the proposed universal waste system for certain widely generated hazardous wastes (primarily nickel-cadmium batteries and canceled pesticides), allowing generators to ship their lamps without a hazardous waste manifest and store lamps for a longer time.
 
07/14/1994MANAGEMENT OPTIONS FOR MERCURY-CONTAINING LAMPSMemo
 Description: Fluorescent and high-intensity discharge lamps generally exhibit the toxicity characteristic for mercury. A summary of two regulatory options for spent mercury-containing lamps as proposed in the 7/24/94 Federal Register (59 FR 38288) is provided (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99).
 
07/14/1994MANAGEMENT OPTIONS FOR MERCURY-CONTAINING LAMPSMemo
 Description: EPA Headquarters does not generally make regulatory decisions concerning the legitimacy of specific recycling operations. These issues are decided on a site-specific basis. Sham recycling is a site-specific issue (SEE ALSO: 64 FR 36466; 7/6/99).
 
04/15/1994Analysis of Potential Cost Savings and the Potential for Reduced Environmental Benefits of the Proposed Universal Waste RulePublication
 Description: This document addresses proposed changes to the management of universal wastes (e.g., nickel-cadmium and mercuric oxide batteries, mercury-containing thermostats) under RCRA. It discusses characteristics of universal wastes, cost analysis, and potential for reduction in environmental benefits, and the appendix lists sources for unit cost estimates.
 
07/28/1993RESPONSE TO REQUEST FOR RCRA EXEMPTION FOR FLUORESCENT LAMPSMemo
 Description: The crushing of mercury-containing fluorescent lamps constitutes hazardous waste treatment, but it can be exempt from regulation if it is a necessary part of a legitimate recycling process (SUPERSEDED: lamp crushing by universal waste handlers is prohibited; see 64 FR 36466, 36477-36478; 7/6/99). The storage of crushed lamps is still subject to regulation.
 
07/27/1993RESPONSE TO QUESTIONS ON ENGINE COOLANT RECYCLING SYSTEMMemo
 Description: EPA is considering regulating engine coolant and antifreeze under the universal waste regulations (SEE ALSO: 60 FR 23928; 5/11/95).
 
07/14/1993RESPONSE TO REQUEST FOR OPINION ON SECTION 21 PETITION ON BATTERY DEPOSITSMemo
 Description: The toxicity characteristic (TC) is designed to identify wastes that may pose a risk to human health and the environment under a reasonable worst-case mismanagement scenario. Some spent batteries (battery) would fail the toxicity characteristic for lead (D008), cadmium (D006), and mercury (D009). Batteries may be eligible for the universal waste regulations. Batteries generated by households and conditionally exempt small quantity generators (CESQGs) are generally exempt from Subtitle C regulation.
 
04/19/1993DISCUSSION PAPER ON POSSIBLE UNIVERSAL WASTEMemo
 Description: EPA is evaluating the applicability of the household hazardous waste (HHW) exclusion to lead-based paint abatement wastes (SEE ALSO: 63 FR 70233, 70241; 12/18/98). Part 279 prohibits the storage of used oil in unlined surface impoundments and applying used oil to roads. Fluorescent bulbs may be conditionally exempt in the future. EPA does not believe that F001-F005 solvents should be included as universal wastes. EPA is currently studying other solvent wastes to determine if they merit a listing (SEE ALSO: 61 FR 42318; 8/14/96). Spent antifreeze may exhibit the toxicity characteristic for lead and/or benzene. EPA is evaluating toxicity characteristic levels for lead and pentachlorophenol (PCP). New MCLs could affect future toxicity characteristic levels. Sandblast grit from the removal of lead-based paint may be D008.
 
07/28/1986BATTERY RECONDITIONINGMemo
 Description: The regeneration and resale of used lead-acid batteries (battery) is exempt from regulation (SUPERSEDED: 261.6(a)(3)(ii) removed in 60 FR 25535; 5/11/95) (SEE ALSO: 266.80(a) and Part 273).
 
07/02/1986REGENERATION OF USED BATTERIES EXEMPTED FROM REGULATIONMemo
 Description: Discusses the regulatory status of regenerated batteries (battery) under Section 261.6(a)(3)(ii) (SUPERSEDED: See Part 273, 60 FR 25535; 5/11/95, and current Section 261.6(a)(3)). Discusses the definition of regeneration.
 
Show details for Used OilUsed Oil
Show details for VariancesVariances
Show details for Waste Determinations for Combusted Non-Hazardous Secondary MaterialsWaste Determinations for Combusted Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials
Show details for Waste MinimizationWaste Minimization
Show details for Waste PilesWaste Piles
Show details for Waste ReductionWaste Reduction
Show details for Wood Preserving WastesWood Preserving Wastes
Show details for (Not Categorized)(Not Categorized)
For more information on commonly used environmental terms please visit the Terms of the Environment EPA Home Page

 

 
Begin Site Footer

EPA Home | Privacy and Security Notice | Contact Us